Ethnographic significance in researching management accounting: Bangladesh and Sri Lanka

Alam, S., Ranasinghe, S. B. and Wickramasinghe, D. (2019) Ethnographic significance in researching management accounting: Bangladesh and Sri Lanka. In: Weetman, P. and Tsalavoutas, I. (eds.) The Routledge Companion to Accounting in Emerging Economies. Series: Routledge companions in business, management and accounting. Routledge: Abingdon, pp. 235-246. ISBN 9780815356202 (doi:10.4324/9781351128506-19)

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Abstract

Applying an ethnographic methodology allows the researcher to show how people’s everyday life is manifested in management accounting and control practices. The chapter reflects on two cases. One studied Bangladesh’s microfinance practices where illiterate women produce ‘oral accounts’ as part of alleviating rural poverty, while the other studied the management control practices of a Sri Lankan tea plantation where tea-plucking women exploited the opportunities of neoliberalism to reconstruct the prevailing system of management controls. Validation is achieved by the interaction of theory with the story. A story may act as an illustration of theory, or a theory may illuminate the story.

Item Type:Book Sections
Status:Published
Glasgow Author(s) Enlighten ID:Ranasinghe, Mrs Seuwandhi Buddh and Alam, Mr Saiful and Wickramasinghe, Professor Danture
Authors: Alam, S., Ranasinghe, S. B., and Wickramasinghe, D.
College/School:College of Social Sciences > Adam Smith Business School > Accounting and Finance
Publisher:Routledge
ISBN:9780815356202
Copyright Holders:Copyright © 2020 The Contributors
First Published:First published in The Routledge Companion to Accounting in Emerging Economies: 235-246
Publisher Policy:Reproduced in accordance with the publisher copyright policy

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