Tuberculosis transmission attributable to close contacts and HIV status, Malawi

Crampin, A. C. , Glynn, J. R., Traore, H., Yates, M. D., Mwaungulu, L., Mwenebabu, M., Chaguluka, S. D., Floyd, S., Drobniewski, F. and Fine, P. E.M. (2006) Tuberculosis transmission attributable to close contacts and HIV status, Malawi. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 12(5), pp. 729-735. (doi:10.3201/eid1205.050789) (PMID:16704828) (PMCID:PMC3374426)

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Abstract

We conducted the first molecular study of tuberculosis (TB) to estimate the role of household contact and transmission from HIV-positive putative source contacts (PSCs) in a high HIV-prevalence area. TB patients in a long-term population-based study in Malawi were asked about past contact with TB. DNA fingerprinting was used to define clusters of cases with identical strains. Among 143 epidemiologically defined PSC-case pairs, fingerprinting confirmed transmission for 44% of household and family contacts and 18% of other contacts. Transmission was less likely to be confirmed if the PSC were HIV positive than if he or she was HIV negative (odds ratio 0.32, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.14–0.74). Overall, epidemiologic links were found for 11% of 754 fingerprint-clustered cases. We estimate that 9%–13% of TB cases were attributable to recent transmission from identifiable close contacts and that nearly half of the TB cases arising from recent infection had acquired the infection from HIV-positive patients.

Item Type:Articles
Additional Information:Until 1996, the Karonga Prevention Study was funded primarily by the British Leprosy Relief Association and the International Federation of Anti-Leprosy Organizations with contributions from the World Health Organization/United Nations Development Programme/World Bank Special Programme for Research and Training in Tropical Diseases. Since 1996, the Wellcome Trust has been the principal source of funds. J.R.G. was supported in part by the UK Department for International Development, and is now funded by the UK Department of Health (Public Health Career Scientist award).
Status:Published
Refereed:Yes
Glasgow Author(s) Enlighten ID:Crampin, Professor Mia
Authors: Crampin, A. C., Glynn, J. R., Traore, H., Yates, M. D., Mwaungulu, L., Mwenebabu, M., Chaguluka, S. D., Floyd, S., Drobniewski, F., and Fine, P. E.M.
College/School:College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > Institute of Health and Wellbeing > Public Health
Journal Name:Emerging Infectious Diseases
Publisher:Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
ISSN:1080-6040
ISSN (Online):1080-6059
Copyright Holders:Copyright © 2006 The Authors
First Published:First published in Emerging Infectious Diseases 12(5):729-735
Publisher Policy:Reproduced in accordance with the publisher copyright policy

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