Epileptogenic neocortical networks are revealed by abnormal temporal dynamics in seizure-free subdural EEG

Monto, S., Vanhatalo, S., Holmes, M. D. and Palva, J. M. (2007) Epileptogenic neocortical networks are revealed by abnormal temporal dynamics in seizure-free subdural EEG. Cerebral Cortex, 17(6), pp. 1386-1393. (doi:10.1093/cercor/bhl049) (PMID:16908492)

Monto, S., Vanhatalo, S., Holmes, M. D. and Palva, J. M. (2007) Epileptogenic neocortical networks are revealed by abnormal temporal dynamics in seizure-free subdural EEG. Cerebral Cortex, 17(6), pp. 1386-1393. (doi:10.1093/cercor/bhl049) (PMID:16908492)

Full text not currently available from Enlighten.

Abstract

Long-term video electroencephalographic (EEG) recording is currently a routine procedure in the presurgical evaluation of localization-related epilepsies. Cortical epileptogenic zone is usually localized from ictal recordings with intracranial electrodes, causing a significant burden to patients and health care. Growing literature suggests that epileptogenic networks exhibit aberrant dynamics also during seizure-free periods. We examined if neocortical epileptogenic regions can be circumscribed by quantifying local long-range temporal (auto-)correlations (LRTC) with detrended fluctuation analysis of seizure-free ongoing subdural EEG activity in 4 frequency bands in 5 patients. We show here with subdural EEG recordings that the LRTC are abnormally strong near the seizure onset area. This effect was most salient in neocortical oscillations in the beta frequency band (14–30 Hz). Moreover, lorazepam, a widely used antiepileptic drug, exerted contrasting effects on LRTC (n = 2): lorazepam attenuated beta-band LRTC near the epileptic focus, whereas it strengthened LRTC in other cortical areas. Our findings demonstrate that interictal neuronal network activity near the focus of seizure onset has pathologically strong intrinsic temporal correlations. The observed effect by lorazepam on beta-band activity suggests that the antiepileptic mechanism of benzodiazepines may be related to the normalization of LRTC within the epileptic focus. We propose that this method may become a promising candidate for routine invasive and noninvasive presurgical localization of epileptic foci.

Item Type:Articles
Status:Published
Refereed:Yes
Glasgow Author(s) Enlighten ID:Palva, Professor Matias
Authors: Monto, S., Vanhatalo, S., Holmes, M. D., and Palva, J. M.
College/School:College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > Institute of Neuroscience and Psychology
Journal Name:Cerebral Cortex
Publisher:Oxford University Press
ISSN:1047-3211
ISSN (Online):1460-2199

University Staff: Request a correction | Enlighten Editors: Update this record