Transitioning to adulthood with a mild intellectual disability: Young people's experiences, expectations, and aspirations

Salt, E., Melville, C. and Jahoda, A. (2019) Transitioning to adulthood with a mild intellectual disability: Young people's experiences, expectations, and aspirations. Journal of Applied Research in Intellectual Disabilities, 32(4), pp. 901-912. (doi: 10.1111/jar.12582) (PMID:30950169)

[img]
Preview
Text
179511.pdf - Accepted Version

712kB

Abstract

Aim: Very little attention has been paid to the views and experiences of young people with mild intellectual disabilities on the broad topics of adulthood and adult identity. The following study was undertaken to explore how young adults with mild intellectual disabilities conceptualize, relate to, and experience the process of transition. Method: Eight young adults with mild to borderline intellectual disabilities participated in semi‐structured interviews. Results were analysed using interpretive thematic analysis. Results: Two umbrella themes were identified: “On a developmental pathway” and “Negotiations in the environment”. Conclusions: The participants concerns were surprisingly similar to those commonly expressed by young adults without disabilities. Self‐perceived adult identity appeared to be affected by the participants' personal definitions of adulthood, as well as by social comparisons with both peers and adults. Finally, while concerns were expressed about their capacity to cope with responsibility, most felt optimistic about adopting full adult status in the future.

Item Type:Articles
Status:Published
Refereed:Yes
Glasgow Author(s) Enlighten ID:Jahoda, Professor Andrew and Salt, Emily and Melville, Professor Craig
Authors: Salt, E., Melville, C., and Jahoda, A.
College/School:College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences
College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > Institute of Health and Wellbeing > Mental Health and Wellbeing
Journal Name:Journal of Applied Research in Intellectual Disabilities
Publisher:Wiley-Blackwell Publishing Ltd.
ISSN:1360-2322
ISSN (Online):1468-3148
Published Online:05 April 2019
Copyright Holders:Copyright © 2019 John Wiley & Sons
First Published:First published in Journal of Applied Research in Intellectual Disabilities 32(4):901-912
Publisher Policy:Reproduced in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher

University Staff: Request a correction | Enlighten Editors: Update this record