Dose-response associations of cardiorespiratory fitness with all-cause mortality, and also cancer, cardiovascular and respiratory disease mortality and incidence: the UK Biobank cohort study

Steell, L. et al. (2019) Dose-response associations of cardiorespiratory fitness with all-cause mortality, and also cancer, cardiovascular and respiratory disease mortality and incidence: the UK Biobank cohort study. British Journal of Sports Medicine, (Accepted for Publication)

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Abstract

Objective: To investigate the association of cardiorespiratory fitness with all-cause mortality, and cardiovascular, respiratory, COPD and cancer mortality and incidence. Design: Prospective population based study. Setting: UK Biobank. Participants: Of the 502,628 (5.5% response rate) participants recruited by UK Biobank, we included 73,259 (14.6%) participants with available data in this analysis. Of these, 1,374 participants died and 4,210 developed circulatory diseases, 1,293 respiratory diseases and 4,281 cancer, over a median of 5.0 years [IQR 4.3–5.7] follow-up. Main outcome measures - All-cause mortality and circulatory disease, respiratory disease, chronic obstructive e pulmonary disease (COPD) and cancer (any-type, colorectal, lung, breast and prostate) mortality/incidence. Fitness was estimated with a submaximal cycle ergometer test. Results: The hazard ratio for all-cause mortality for each MET higher fitness was 0.96 ([95% CI 0.93–0.98]). Similar results were observed for incident circulatory (HR 0.96 [0.95–0.97]), respiratory disease (HR 0.96 [0.94–0.98]), COPD (HR 0.90 [0.86–0.95]), and colorectal cancer (HR 0.96 [0.92–1.00]). Nonlinear analysis revealed that a high level of fitness (>10 METs) was associated with a greater incidence of atrial fibrillation (HR 1.24 [1.07–1.44]) and prostate cancer (HR 1.16 [1.02–1.32]) compared with average fitness. All results were adjusted for sociodemographic, lifestyle, and dietary factors, body composition, and morbidity at baseline and excluded events in the first 2 years of follow up. Conclusions: Higher cardiorespiratory fitness was associated with lower risk of premature mortality and incidence of cardiovascular, respiratory disease and colorectal cancer.

Item Type:Articles
Additional Information:The UK Biobank was supported by the Wellcome Trust, Medical Research Council, Department of Health, Scottish government, and Northwest Regional Development Agency. It has also had funding from the Welsh Assembly government and British Heart Foundation. The research was designed, conducted, analysed, and interpreted by the authors entirely independently of the funding sources.
Status:Accepted for Publication
Refereed:Yes
Glasgow Author(s) Enlighten ID:Celis, Dr Carlos and Ho, Dr Frederick and Gray, Dr Stuart and Gill, Professor Jason and Sillars, Miss Anne and Welsh, Dr Paul and Anderson, Dr Jana and Iliodromiti, Dr Stamatina and Pell, Professor Jill and Mackay, Dr Daniel and Steell, Mr Lewis and Petermann, Mrs Fanny and Sattar, Professor Naveed
Authors: Steell, L., Ho, F. K., Sillars, A., Petermann, F., Li, H., Lyall, D. M., Iliodromiti, S., Welsh, P., Anderson, J., Mackay, D. F., Pell, J. P., Sattar, N., Gill, J. M.R., Gray, S. R., and Celis-Morales, C. A.
College/School:College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > Institute of Cardiovascular and Medical Sciences
College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > Institute of Health and Wellbeing > General Practice and Primary Care
College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > Institute of Health and Wellbeing > Public Health
Journal Name:British Journal of Sports Medicine
Publisher:BMJ Publishing Group
ISSN:0306-3674
ISSN (Online):1473-0480

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