Medically timed death as an enactment of good death: an ethnographic study of three European intensive care units

Koksvik, G. H. (2018) Medically timed death as an enactment of good death: an ethnographic study of three European intensive care units. Omega: Journal of Death and Dying, (doi:10.1177/0030222818756555) (PMID:29402160)

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Abstract

The article is based on ethnographic observation and semistructured interviews with personnel in three European adult intensive care units. Intensive care is a domain of contemporary biomedicine centered on invasive and intense efforts to save lives in acute, critical conditions. It echoes our culture’s values of longevity. Nevertheless, mortality rates are elevated. Many deaths follow from nontreatment decisions. Medicalized dying in technological medical settings are often presented as unnatural, impersonal, and undesirable ways of dying. How does this affect the way in which death is experienced by intensive care professionals? What might the enactment of dying in intensive care reveal about our cultural values of good and bad dying?

Item Type:Articles
Additional Information:Gitte H. Koksvik’s PhD was graciously funded through the Cultural Logic of Facts and Figures (CUFF) project was financed by the Norwegian Research Council.
Status:Published
Refereed:Yes
Glasgow Author(s) Enlighten ID:Koksvik, Dr Gitte
Authors: Koksvik, G. H.
College/School:College of Social Sciences > School of Interdisciplinary Studies
Journal Name:Omega: Journal of Death and Dying
Publisher:SAGE
ISSN:0030-2228
ISSN (Online):1541-3764
Published Online:05 February 2018

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