Ideology and disengagement: a case study of nationalists and Islamists in Chechnya

Souleimanov, E. A. and Aliyev, H. (2020) Ideology and disengagement: a case study of nationalists and Islamists in Chechnya. Europe-Asia Studies, 72(2), pp. 314-330. (doi: 10.1080/09668136.2019.1694864)

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Abstract

Disengagement from militant groups has often been related to individual level explanations like battle fatigue or desire to re-join family and friends. We seek to empirically examine which other factors, beyond individual level determinants, influenced disengagement processes among militants belonging to different types of Chechen militant organizations. Drawing empirical insights from unique in-depth interviews with former members of Chechen insurgency, their relatives, eyewitnesses of Chechen wars, and experts with first-hand knowledge of the researched phenomena, this study examines disengagement among jihadist and nationalist Chechen militants. Focusing on group-level factors, such as capacity to resist external pressures, use of violence, in-group social bonds and group cohesion, this article demonstrates that disengagement was a less viable course of action for Chechen jihadists than for nationalist militants.

Item Type:Articles
Additional Information:Funding: This work was supported by University of Glasgow [grant number Lord Kelvin Adam Smith fellowship].
Status:Published
Refereed:Yes
Glasgow Author(s) Enlighten ID:Aliyev, Dr Huseyn
Authors: Souleimanov, E. A., and Aliyev, H.
Subjects:J Political Science > JA Political science (General)
J Political Science > JZ International relations
College/School:College of Social Sciences > School of Social and Political Sciences > Central and East European Studies
Research Group:Statehood, Nationhood and Identity
Journal Name:Europe-Asia Studies
Publisher:Taylor and Francis
ISSN:0966-8136
ISSN (Online):1465-3427
Published Online:17 December 2019
Copyright Holders:Copyright © 2019 University of Glasgow
First Published:First published in Europe-Asia Studies 72(2): 314-330
Publisher Policy:Reproduced in accordance with the publisher copyright policy

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