What can secondary data tell us about household food insecurity in a high-income country context?

Ejebu, O.-Z., Whybrow, S., Mckenzie, L., Dowler, E., Garcia, A. L. , Ludbrook, A., Barton, K., Wrieden, W. and Douglas, F. (2018) What can secondary data tell us about household food insecurity in a high-income country context? International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, 16(1), 82. (doi: 10.3390/ijerph16010082) (PMID:30597954) (PMCID:30597954)

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Abstract

In the absence of routinely collected household food insecurity data, this study investigated what could be determined about the nature and prevalence of household food insecurity in Scotland from secondary data. Secondary analysis of the Living Costs and Food Survey (2007–2012) was conducted to calculate weekly food expenditure and its ratio to equivalised income for households below average income (HBAI) and above average income (non-HBAI). Diet Quality Index (DQI) scores were calculated for this survey and the Scottish Health Survey (SHeS, 2008 and 2012). Secondary data provided a partial picture of food insecurity prevalence in Scotland, and a limited picture of differences in diet quality. In 2012, HBAI spent significantly less in absolute terms per week on food and non-alcoholic drinks (£53.85) compared to non-HBAI (£86.73), but proportionately more of their income (29% and 15% respectively). Poorer households were less likely to achieve recommended fruit and vegetable intakes than were more affluent households. The mean DQI score (SHeS data) of HBAI fell between 2008 and 2012, and was significantly lower than the mean score for non-HBAI in 2012. Secondary data are insufficient to generate the robust and comprehensive picture needed to monitor the incidence and prevalence of food insecurity in Scotland.

Item Type:Articles
Additional Information:This research was funded by NHS Health Scotland with additional funding support provided for Flora Douglas’ and Stephen Whybrow’s time from the Scottish Government’s RESAS programme. Core support to HERU from the Chief Scientist Office Scottish Government Health and Social Care Directorates and the University of Aberdeen is gratefully acknowledged.
Status:Published
Refereed:Yes
Glasgow Author(s) Enlighten ID:Garcia, Dr Ada
Authors: Ejebu, O.-Z., Whybrow, S., Mckenzie, L., Dowler, E., Garcia, A. L., Ludbrook, A., Barton, K., Wrieden, W., and Douglas, F.
College/School:College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > School of Medicine, Dentistry & Nursing
Journal Name:International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health
Publisher:Molecular Diversity Preservation International
ISSN:1661-7827
ISSN (Online):1660-4601
Copyright Holders:Copyright © 2018 The Authors
First Published:First published in International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 16(1):82
Publisher Policy:Reproduced under a Creative Commons License

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