Education professionals’ attitudes towards the inclusion of children with ADHD: the role of knowledge and stigma

Toye, M. K., Wilson, C. and Wardle, G. A. (2018) Education professionals’ attitudes towards the inclusion of children with ADHD: the role of knowledge and stigma. Journal of Research in Special Educational Needs, (doi:10.1111/1471-3802.12441) (Early Online Publication)

Toye, M. K., Wilson, C. and Wardle, G. A. (2018) Education professionals’ attitudes towards the inclusion of children with ADHD: the role of knowledge and stigma. Journal of Research in Special Educational Needs, (doi:10.1111/1471-3802.12441) (Early Online Publication)

[img] Text
175428.pdf - Accepted Version
Restricted to Repository staff only until 4 December 2020.

701kB

Abstract

Attitudes play a pivotal role in the inclusion of children with Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) in mainstream schools but little is known about factors that influence these. This study investigated the effect of ADHD knowledge and stigma on professionals attitudes towards mainstream inclusion. Teachers, support staff, school managers and educational psychologists completed questionnaires assessing ADHD knowledge, stigma and attitudes towards inclusion. Psychologists displayed more knowledge, had less stigmatising beliefs and more inclusive attitudes than other professions. Regression analyses revealed those with more knowledge of ADHD and less stigma held more positive attitudes towards mainstream inclusion. Results have implications for how to promote inclusive beliefs about ADHD.

Item Type:Articles
Status:Early Online Publication
Refereed:Yes
Glasgow Author(s) Enlighten ID:Toye, Mr Martin and Wardle, Dr Georgina
Authors: Toye, M. K., Wilson, C., and Wardle, G. A.
College/School:College of Social Sciences > School of Education
College of Social Sciences > School of Education > Pedagogy Policy and Practice
Journal Name:Journal of Research in Special Educational Needs
Publisher:Wiley
ISSN:1471-3802
ISSN (Online):1471-3802
Copyright Holders:Copyright © 2018 NASEN
First Published:First published in Journal of Research in Special Educational Needs 2019
Publisher Policy:Reproduced in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher

University Staff: Request a correction | Enlighten Editors: Update this record