Beliefs about aggression and submissiveness: a comparison of aggressive and nonaggressive individuals with mild intellectual disability

Kirk, J.D., Jahoda, A. and Pert, C. (2008) Beliefs about aggression and submissiveness: a comparison of aggressive and nonaggressive individuals with mild intellectual disability. Journal of Mental Health Research in Intellectual Disabilities, 1(3), pp. 191-204.

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Abstract

Recent research has examined the relevance of the social information processing model of aggression to individuals with intellectual disability (ID). This study investigated the “response access” and “response decision” steps of this model. Photo stories were used to compare aggressive and nonaggressive individuals' beliefs about the outcomes of responding aggressively and submissively in situations of interpersonal conflict. Coding of participants' open-ended answers indicated that aggressive individuals anticipated that aggressive responses would result in more favorable outcomes than their nonaggressive peers. The aggressive participants also made more negative evaluations of submissive responses. These findings have important implications for the assessment and treatment of aggression with people who have mild ID.

Item Type:Articles
Status:Published
Refereed:Yes
Glasgow Author(s) Enlighten ID:Kirk, Dr Jamie and Pert, Dr Carol and Jahoda, Professor Andrew
Authors: Kirk, J.D., Jahoda, A., and Pert, C.
College/School:College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > Institute of Health and Wellbeing > Mental Health and Wellbeing
College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > School of Medicine, Dentistry & Nursing > Clinical Specialities
Journal Name:Journal of Mental Health Research in Intellectual Disabilities
Publisher:Taylor & Francis
ISSN:1931-5864
ISSN (Online):1931-5872
Published Online:14 June 2008

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