An Exploration of the Use of Patient-reported Outcome Measures (PROMs) by Gynaecology Cancer Nurse Specialists in the Delivery of Supportive Care to Women with Cervical Cancer

Kotronoulas, G. , Maguire, R., O'Brien, F. and Simpson, M.F. (2016) An Exploration of the Use of Patient-reported Outcome Measures (PROMs) by Gynaecology Cancer Nurse Specialists in the Delivery of Supportive Care to Women with Cervical Cancer. UKONS Annual Conference, Brighton, UK, 11-12 Nov 2016.

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Abstract

Introduction: Logistics pertinent to the use of patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs) by Colorectal cancer nurse specialists (CNS) to identify the unmet needs of people with colorectal cancer (CRC) [1] in the acute care setting remain unknown. Aims/Objectives: We explored the feasibility and acceptability of PROMs-driven, CNS-led consultations to enhance delivery of supportive care to people with CRC at the end of adjuvant chemotherapy and during immediate follow-up within NHS Lanarkshire. Methodology: A systematic literature review and focus groups with patients and CNS (Phase 1) were followed by a repeated-measures, exploratory study (Phase 2), whereby pre-consultation PROM data were collected during three consecutive, monthly consultations, and used by the CNS to enable delivery of personalised supportive care. Results: Based on Phase 1 data, the Supportive Care Needs Survey [2] was selected for use in Phase 2. Fourteen patients were recruited (recruitment rate: 56%); thirteen (93%) completed all 3 study assessments. Forty in-clinic patient-clinician consultations took place. At baseline, 219 unmet needs were reported in total, with a notable 21% (T2) and 32% (T3) over-time reduction. Physical/daily living and psychological domain scores declined from T1 to T3, but not statistically significantly. In exit interviews, patients described how using the PROM helped them shortlist and prioritise their needs. CNS stressed how the PROM helped them tease out more issues with patients than they would normally. Conclusions: Nurse-led, PROMs-driven needs assessments with patients with CRC are both feasible and acceptable, and may be associated with a sizeable reduction in the frequency of unmet needs, and smaller decreases in physical/daily living and psychosocial needs in the immediate post-chemotherapy period. Service Improvement: Provided that such improvements are confirmed in a larger, multi-centre trial, this intervention appears to be an effective means to provide comprehensive, nurse-led supportive care to people with CRC during and after adjuvant chemotherapy.

Item Type:Conference or Workshop Item
Status:Published
Refereed:Yes
Glasgow Author(s) Enlighten ID:Kotronoulas, Dr Greg
Authors: Kotronoulas, G., Maguire, R., O'Brien, F., and Simpson, M.F.
College/School:College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > School of Medicine, Dentistry & Nursing > Nursing and Health Care

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