Gated neighbourhoods, privatized amenities and fragmented society: evidence from residential experience and implications for urban planning

Wang, Y., Shaw, D. and Yuan, K. (2018) Gated neighbourhoods, privatized amenities and fragmented society: evidence from residential experience and implications for urban planning. Sustainability, 10(11), 4301. (doi:10.3390/su10114301)

Wang, Y., Shaw, D. and Yuan, K. (2018) Gated neighbourhoods, privatized amenities and fragmented society: evidence from residential experience and implications for urban planning. Sustainability, 10(11), 4301. (doi:10.3390/su10114301)

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Abstract

Nowadays, urban space has become more fragmented and largely consists of many unconnected enclaves. The significance of neighborhood amenities to resident’s quality of life has been identified in the recent literature. However, studies have inadequately explored the real experience of residents in their use of neighborhood amenities under the gated urban form. Since the 1990s the urban environment of many Chinese cities has been re-shaped by the large creation of gated neighborhoods. Based on a case study in the city of Shenzhen, this paper draws upon evidence of residential satisfaction with local amenities to reveal a significant variation between different neighborhoods. The outcome of the enlarged social differentiation is a result of imbalanced micro-level urban development. The findings also provide new evidence demonstrating the increased fragmentation of society as the consequence of urban privatization. By linking the planning process with the social outcome, this paper reflects on the current strengths and weaknesses of the Chinese urban planning system.

Item Type:Articles
Status:Published
Refereed:Yes
Glasgow Author(s) Enlighten ID:Yuan, Mr Ke and Wang, Dr Yu
Authors: Wang, Y., Shaw, D., and Yuan, K.
College/School:College of Social Sciences > School of Social and Political Sciences > Urban Studies
Journal Name:Sustainability
Publisher:MDPI
ISSN:2071-1050
ISSN (Online):2071-1050
Copyright Holders:Copyright © 2018 The Authors
First Published:First published in Sustainability 10(11):4301
Publisher Policy:Reproduced under a Creative Commons License

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Project CodeAward NoProject NamePrincipal InvestigatorFunder's NameFunder RefLead Dept
706021The Re-Making of Chinese Urban Neighbourhoods: Spatial and socio-economic transformations and access to public services in Tianjin, Hangzhou, ChengduYa Ping WangEconomic and Social Research Council (ESRC)ES/N010981/1SPS - URBAN STUDIES