Increasingly diverse: the changing ethnic profiles of Scotland and Glasgow and the implications for population health

Walsh, D., Buchanan, D., Douglas, A., Erdman, J., Fischbacher, C., McCartney, G., Norman, P. and Whyte, B. (2019) Increasingly diverse: the changing ethnic profiles of Scotland and Glasgow and the implications for population health. Applied Spatial Analysis and Policy, 12(4), pp. 983-1009. (doi: 10.1007/s12061-018-9281-7)

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Abstract

Scotland’s population has become increasingly ethnically diverse. The aim of this study was to better understand future changes to the ethnic profile of the population and the implications for population health. The literature regarding ethnicity and health, particularly in the Scottish context, was reviewed alongside analyses of past trends and new future projections (2011–2031) of the size of the non-White ethnic minority population in Scotland and Glasgow (Scotland’s largest and most ethnically diverse city). The literature emphasises that the relationships between ethnicity, socioeconomic position (SEP) and health are extremely complex. In Scotland this complexity is arguably enhanced, given the different, less disadvantaged, SEP profile of many ethnic minority groups compared with those in other countries. Although indicators of overall health status have been shown to be better among many non-White ethnic minority groups compared with the White Scottish population, such analyses mask varying risks of particular diseases among different groups. This complexity extends to understanding the underlying causes of these differences, including the ‘healthy migrant’ effect, ‘acculturation’, and the impact of different types and measures of SEP. The proportion of the population belonging to a non-White ethnic group increased four-fold in both Scotland and Glasgow between 1991 and 2011. New projections suggest that by 2031, around 20% of Glasgow’s total population (and 25% of children) will belong to a non-White minority group. Given this, there is a clear need for policy-makers and service-planners to seek to understand the implications of these changes to the Scottish population.

Item Type:Articles
Status:Published
Refereed:Yes
Glasgow Author(s) Enlighten ID:Whyte, Mr Bruce and Walsh, Dr David
Authors: Walsh, D., Buchanan, D., Douglas, A., Erdman, J., Fischbacher, C., McCartney, G., Norman, P., and Whyte, B.
College/School:College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > Institute of Health and Wellbeing > Public Health
Journal Name:Applied Spatial Analysis and Policy
Publisher:Springer
ISSN:1874-463X
ISSN (Online):1874-4621
Published Online:30 October 2018
Copyright Holders:Copyright © 2018 The Authors
First Published:First published in Applied Spatial Analysis and Policy 12(4): 983-1009
Publisher Policy:Reproduced under a Creative Commons License

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