Language as communication vs. language as art: J.R.R. Tolkien and early 20th-century radical linguistic experimentation

Fimi, D. (2018) Language as communication vs. language as art: J.R.R. Tolkien and early 20th-century radical linguistic experimentation. Journal of Tolkien Research, 5(1), 2.

[img]
Preview
Text
170110.pdf - Published Version
Available under License Creative Commons Attribution.

606kB

Publisher's URL: https://scholar.valpo.edu/journaloftolkienresearch/vol5/iss1/2

Abstract

This article situates Tolkien’s “A Secret Vice” (and its accompanying notes and papers) within the cultural and intellectual milieu of the early 20th century. It claims that at the heart of Tolkien’s exploration in this material is the question of language as communication vs. language as art. It argues that Tolkien’s language invention navigates the (perceived) binary between a utilitarian aim for language invention (contemporary International Auxiliary Languages) vs. an aesthetic linguistic pursuit (contemporary Modernist and other avant-garde linguistic experimentation), by choosing a third (middle) way. It examines Tolkien's linguistic invention alongside the work of Sapir, Jespersen, Joyce, Stein, and the Dada and zaum poets.

Item Type:Articles
Status:Published
Refereed:Yes
Glasgow Author(s) Enlighten ID:Fimi, Dr Dimitra
Authors: Fimi, D.
College/School:College of Arts > School of Critical Studies > English Literature
Journal Name:Journal of Tolkien Research
Publisher:Valparaiso University
ISSN:2471-934X
ISSN (Online):2471-934X
Copyright Holders:Copyright © 2018 The Author
First Published:First published in Journal of Tolkien Research 5(1): 2
Publisher Policy:Reproduced under a Creative Commons License

University Staff: Request a correction | Enlighten Editors: Update this record