The PiTSTOP study: a feasibility cluster randomized trial of delirium prevention in care homes for older people

Siddiqi, N. et al. (2016) The PiTSTOP study: a feasibility cluster randomized trial of delirium prevention in care homes for older people. Age and Ageing, 45(5), pp. 651-660. (doi:10.1093/ageing/afw091) (PMID:27207749) (PMCID:PMC5027640)

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Abstract

Background and objectives: delirium is a distressing but potentially preventable condition common in older people in long-term care. It is associated with increased morbidity, mortality, functional decline, hospitalization and significant healthcare costs. Multicomponent interventions, addressing delirium risk factors, have been shown to reduce delirium by one-third in hospitals. It is not known whether this approach is also effective in long-term care. In previous work, we designed a bespoke delirium prevention intervention, called ‘Stop Delirium!’ In preparation for a definitive trial of Stop Delirium, we sought to address key aspects of trial design for the particular circumstances of care homes. Design: a cluster randomized feasibility study with an embedded process evaluation. Setting and participants: residents of 14 care homes for older people in one metropolitan district in the UK. Intervention: Stop Delirium!: a 16-month-enhanced educational package to support care home staff to address key delirium risk factors. Control homes received usual care. Measurements: we collected data to determine the following: recruitment and attrition; delirium rates and variability between homes; feasibility of measuring delirium, resource use, quality of life, hospital admissions and falls; and intervention implementation and adherence. Results: two-thirds (215) of eligible care home residents were recruited. One-month delirium prevalence was 4.0% in intervention and 7.1% in control homes. Proposed outcome measurements were feasible, although our approach appeared to underestimate delirium. Health economic evaluation was feasible using routinely collected data. Conclusion: a definitive trial of delirium prevention in long-term care is needed but will require some further design modifications and pilot work.

Item Type:Articles
Status:Published
Refereed:Yes
Glasgow Author(s) Enlighten ID:Burton, Dr Jenni
Authors: Siddiqi, N., Cheater, F., Collinson, M., Farrin, A., Forster, A., George, D., Godfrey, M., Graham, E., Harrison, J., Heaven, A., Heudtlass, P., Hulme, C., Meads, D., North, C., Sturrock, A., and Young, J.
College/School:College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > Institute of Cardiovascular and Medical Sciences
Journal Name:Age and Ageing
Publisher:Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Geriatrics Society
ISSN:0002-0729
ISSN (Online):1468-2834
Copyright Holders:Copyright © 2016 The Authors
First Published:First published in Age and Ageing 45:651-661
Publisher Policy:Reproduced under a Creative Commons License

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