The epigenetic clock and objectively measured sedentary and walking behavior in older adults: the Lothian Birth Cohort 1936

Gale, C. R. et al. (2018) The epigenetic clock and objectively measured sedentary and walking behavior in older adults: the Lothian Birth Cohort 1936. Clinical Epigenetics, 10, 4. (doi:10.1186/s13148-017-0438-z) (PMID:29321814) (PMCID:PMC5759300)

Gale, C. R. et al. (2018) The epigenetic clock and objectively measured sedentary and walking behavior in older adults: the Lothian Birth Cohort 1936. Clinical Epigenetics, 10, 4. (doi:10.1186/s13148-017-0438-z) (PMID:29321814) (PMCID:PMC5759300)

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Abstract

Background: Estimates of biological age derived from DNA-methylation patterns—known as the epigenetic clock—are associated with mortality, physical and cognitive function, and frailty, but little is known about their relationship with sedentary behavior or physical activity. We investigated the cross-sectional relationship between two such estimates of biological age and objectively measured sedentary and walking behavior in older people. Methods: Participants were 248 members of the Lothian Birth Cohort 1936. At age 79 years, sedentary behavior and physical activity were measured over 7 days using an activPAL activity monitor. Biological age was estimated using two measures of DNA methylation-based age acceleration—i.e., extrinsic and intrinsic epigenetic age acceleration. We used linear regression to assess the relationship between these two estimates of biological age and average daily time spent sedentary, number of sit-to-stand transitions, and step count. Results: Of the six associations examined, only two were statistically significant in initial models adjusted for age and sex alone. Greater extrinsic age acceleration was associated with taking fewer steps (regression coefficient (95% CI) − 0.100 (− 0.008, − 0.001), and greater intrinsic age acceleration was associated with making more sit-to-stand transitions (regression coefficient (95% CI) 0.006 (0.0001, 0.012). When we controlled for multiple statistical testing, neither of these associations survived correction (both P ≥ 0.17). Conclusion: In this cross-sectional study of 79-year-olds, we found no convincing evidence that biological age, as indexed by extrinsic or intrinsic epigenetic age acceleration, was associated with objectively measured sedentary or walking behavior.

Item Type:Articles
Additional Information:This work was supported by the Medical Research Council (MRC) as part of the Lifelong Health and Wellbeing Initiative [MR/K025023/1]. LBC1936 data collection is supported by the Disconnected Mind project (funded by Age UK and MRC [Mr/M01311/1 and G1001245/96077]) and undertaken within the University of Edinburgh Centre for Cognitive Ageing and Cognitive Epidemiology (funded by the BBSRC and MRC as part of the LLHW [MR/ K026992/1]). Methylation typing was supported by The Wellcome Trust Institutional Strategic Support Fund and the University of Edinburgh Gertrude Winifred Gear Fund.
Status:Published
Refereed:Yes
Glasgow Author(s) Enlighten ID:Gray, Dr Lucinda and Der, Mr Geoffrey and Stewart, Miss Sally and Shaw, Dr Richard and Mead, Dr Gillian and Gill, Professor Jason and Hindle, Miss Elaine and Laird, Miss Karen and Sattar, Professor Naveed and Coulter, Dr Elaine and Palmer, Ms Victoria
Authors: Gale, C. R., Marioni, R. E., Čukić, I., Chastin, S. F., Dall, P. M., Dontje, M. L., Skelton, D. A., Deary, I. J., Coulter, E., Der, G., Dontje, M., Fitzsimons, C., Gill, J., Granat, M., Gray, C., Greig, C., Hindle, E., Laird, K., Mead, G., Mutrie, N., Palmer, V., Radakovic, R., Sattar, N., Shaw, R., Starr, J., and Stewart, S.
College/School:College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > Institute of Cardiovascular and Medical Sciences
College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > Institute of Health and Wellbeing > MRC/CSO Unit
College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > Institute of Health and Wellbeing > Mental Health and Wellbeing
College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > Institute of Health and Wellbeing > Social Scientists working in Health and Wellbeing
College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > School of Medicine, Dentistry & Nursing > Nursing and Health Care
Journal Name:Clinical Epigenetics
Publisher:BioMed Central
ISSN:1868-7075
ISSN (Online):1868-7083
Copyright Holders:Copyright © 2018 The Authors
First Published:First published in Clinical Epigenetics 10: 4
Publisher Policy:Reproduced under a Creative Commons License

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Project CodeAward NoProject NamePrincipal InvestigatorFunder's NameFunder RefLead Dept
620531Seniors - understanding sedentary behaviourGeoffrey DerMedical Research Council (MRC)MR/K025023/1IHW - MRC/CSO SPHU