The effects of dietary supplementation with inulin and inulin‐propionate ester on hepatic steatosis in adults with non‐alcoholic fatty liver disease

Chambers, E. S. et al. (2019) The effects of dietary supplementation with inulin and inulin‐propionate ester on hepatic steatosis in adults with non‐alcoholic fatty liver disease. Diabetes, Obesity and Metabolism, 21(2), pp. 372-376. (doi:10.1111/dom.13500) (PMID:30098126)

Chambers, E. S. et al. (2019) The effects of dietary supplementation with inulin and inulin‐propionate ester on hepatic steatosis in adults with non‐alcoholic fatty liver disease. Diabetes, Obesity and Metabolism, 21(2), pp. 372-376. (doi:10.1111/dom.13500) (PMID:30098126)

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Abstract

The short chain fatty acid (SCFA) propionate, produced through fermentation of dietary fibre by the gut microbiota, has been shown to alter hepatic metabolic processes that reduce lipid storage. We aimed to investigate the impact of raising colonic propionate production on hepatic steatosis in adults with non‐alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). Eighteen adults were randomized to receive 20 g/d of an inulin‐propionate ester (IPE), designed to deliver propionate to the colon, or an inulin control for 42 days in a parallel design. The change in intrahepatocellular lipid (IHCL) following the supplementation period was not different between the groups (P = 0.082), however, IHCL significantly increased within the inulin‐control group (20.9% ± 2.9% to 26.8% ± 3.9%; P = 0.012; n = 9), which was not observed within the IPE group (22.6% ± 6.9% to 23.5% ± 6.8%; P = 0.635; n = 9). The predominant SCFA from colonic fermentation of inulin is acetate, which, in a background of NAFLD and a hepatic metabolic profile that promotes fat accretion, may provide surplus lipogenic substrate to the liver. The increased colonic delivery of propionate from IPE appears to attenuate this acetate‐mediated increase in IHCL.

Item Type:Articles
Additional Information:This research study was supported by the NIHR Clinical Research Facility at Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust. The research was supported by an MRC Confidence in Concept fund.
Status:Published
Refereed:Yes
Glasgow Author(s) Enlighten ID:Preston, Professor Thomas and Morrison, Dr Douglas
Authors: Chambers, E. S., Byrne, C. S., Rugyendo, A., Morrison, D. J., Preston, T., Tedford, C., Bell, J. D., Thomas, L., Akbar, A. N., Riddell, N. E., Sharma, R., Thursz, M. R., Manousou, P., and Frost, G.
College/School:College of Science and Engineering > Scottish Universities Environmental Research Centre
Journal Name:Diabetes, Obesity and Metabolism
Publisher:Wiley
ISSN:1462-8902
ISSN (Online):1463-1326
Published Online:11 August 2018
Copyright Holders:Copyright © 2018 The Authors
First Published:First published in Diabetes, Obesity and Metabolism 21(2):372-376
Publisher Policy:Reproduced under a Creative Commons License

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