Particulate emission from the gasification and pyrolysis of biomass: concentration, size distributions, respiratory deposition-based control measure evaluation

Yao, Z., You, S. , Dai, Y. and Wang, C.-H. (2018) Particulate emission from the gasification and pyrolysis of biomass: concentration, size distributions, respiratory deposition-based control measure evaluation. Environmental Pollution, 242(Part B), pp. 1108-1118. (doi:10.1016/j.envpol.2018.07.126) (PMID:30096549)

Yao, Z., You, S. , Dai, Y. and Wang, C.-H. (2018) Particulate emission from the gasification and pyrolysis of biomass: concentration, size distributions, respiratory deposition-based control measure evaluation. Environmental Pollution, 242(Part B), pp. 1108-1118. (doi:10.1016/j.envpol.2018.07.126) (PMID:30096549)

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Abstract

Gasification and pyrolysis technologies have been widely employed to produce fuels and chemicals from solid wastes. Rare studies have been conducted to compare the particulate emissions from gasification and pyrolysis, and relevant inhalation exposure assessment is still lacking. In this work, we characterized the particles emitted from the gasification and pyrolysis experiments under different temperatures (500, 600, and 700 °C). The collection efficiencies of existing cyclones were compared based on particle respiratory deposition. Sensitivity analysis was conducted to identify the most effective design parameters. The particles emitted from both gasification and pyrolysis process are mainly in the size range 0.25–1.0 μm and 1.0–2.5 μm. Particle respiratory deposition modelling showed that most particles penetrate deeply into the last stage of the respiratory system. At the nasal breathing mode, particles with sizes ranging from 0.25 to 1.0 μm account for around 91%, 74%, 76%, 90%, 84%, and 79% of the total number of particles that deposit onto the last stage in the cases of 500 °C gasification, 600 °C gasification, 700 °C gasification, 500 °C pyrolysis, 600 °C pyrolysis, and 700 °C pyrolysis, respectively. At the oral breathing mode, particles with sizes ranging from 0.25 to 1.0 μm account for around 92%, 77%, 79%, 91%, 86%, and 81% of the total number of particles that deposit onto the last stage in the six cases, respectively. Sensitivity analysis showed that the particle removal efficiency was found to be most sensitive to the cyclone vortex finder diameter (D0). This work could potentially serve as the basis for proposing health protective measures against the particulate pollution from gasification and pyrolysis technologies.

Item Type:Articles
Additional Information:This research program is funded by the National Research Foundation, Prime Minister's Office, Singapore under its Campus for Research Excellence and Technological Enterprise (CREATE) program Grant Number R- 706-001-101-281, National University of Singapore.
Status:Published
Refereed:Yes
Glasgow Author(s) Enlighten ID:You, Dr Siming
Authors: Yao, Z., You, S., Dai, Y., and Wang, C.-H.
College/School:College of Science and Engineering > School of Engineering > Systems Power and Energy
Journal Name:Environmental Pollution
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:0269-7491
ISSN (Online):1873-6424
Published Online:01 August 2018
Copyright Holders:Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd.
First Published:First published in Environmental Pollution 242(Part B): 1108-1118
Publisher Policy:Reproduced in accordance with the publisher copyright policy

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