Associations of social and economic and pregnancy exposures with blood pressure in UK White British and Pakistani children age 4/5

West, J., Lawlor, D. A., Santorelli, G., Collings, P., Whincup, P. H., Sattar, N. A. , Farrar, D. and Wright, J. (2018) Associations of social and economic and pregnancy exposures with blood pressure in UK White British and Pakistani children age 4/5. Scientific Reports, 8, 8966. (doi:10.1038/s41598-018-27316-1) (PMID:29895845) (PMCID:PMC5997744)

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Abstract

South Asians have higher rates of coronary heart disease (CHD) than White European individuals. Blood pressure (BP) is one of the most important risk factors for CHD and ethnic differences in BP have been identified in childhood. Early life exposures could explain some of these differences. We examined associations of family social and economic and maternal pregnancy exposures and BP at age 4/5 in 1644 White British and 1824 Pakistani mother-offspring pairs from the Born in Bradford study. We found that systolic BP was similar but diastolic BP was higher, in Pakistani compared to White British children (adjusted mean differences were -0.170 mmHg 95% CI -0.884, 0.543 for systolic BP; 1.328 mmHg 95% CI 0.592, 2.064 for diastolic BP). Social and economic exposures were not associated with BP in either ethnic group. Maternal BMI was positively associated with BP in both groups but this association was mediated by child BMI. Only gestational hypertension was associated with child systolic and diastolic BP and this was only identified in Pakistani mother-offspring pairs. These findings suggest that Pakistani populations may have a different BP trajectory compared to White British groups and that this is already evident at age 4/5 years.

Item Type:Articles
Additional Information:This work was supported by the Wellcome Trust (WT101597MA), a joint grant from the UK Medical Research Council (MRC) and Economic and Social Science Research Council (ESRC) (MR/N024397/1), the British Heart Foundation (CS/16/4/32482), US National Institute of Health (R01 DK10324) and European Research Council under the European Union’s Seventh Framework Programme (FP7/2007-2013)/ERC grant agreement no 669545. JW is supported by a UK Medical Research Council (MRC) Population Health Scientist Postdoctoral Award (MR/K021656/1). DAL works in a unit that receives UK MRC funding (MC_UU_12013/5) and is an NIHR senior investigator (NF-SI-0611-10196).
Status:Published
Refereed:Yes
Glasgow Author(s) Enlighten ID:Sattar, Professor Naveed
Authors: West, J., Lawlor, D. A., Santorelli, G., Collings, P., Whincup, P. H., Sattar, N. A., Farrar, D., and Wright, J.
College/School:College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > Institute of Cardiovascular and Medical Sciences
Journal Name:Scientific Reports
Publisher:Nature Publishing Group
ISSN:2045-2322
ISSN (Online):2045-2322
Copyright Holders:Copyright © 2018 The Authors
First Published:First published in Scientific Reports 8: 8966
Publisher Policy:Reproduced under a Creative Commons License
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