Self-assembly of polyoxometalate-peptide hybrids in solution: elucidating the contributions of multiple possible driving forces

Luo, J., Zhang, B., Yvon, C., Hutin, M., Gerislioglu, S., Wesdemiotis, C., Cronin, L. and Liu, T. (2019) Self-assembly of polyoxometalate-peptide hybrids in solution: elucidating the contributions of multiple possible driving forces. European Journal of Inorganic Chemistry, 2019(3-4), pp. 380-386. (doi:10.1002/ejic.201800158)

Luo, J., Zhang, B., Yvon, C., Hutin, M., Gerislioglu, S., Wesdemiotis, C., Cronin, L. and Liu, T. (2019) Self-assembly of polyoxometalate-peptide hybrids in solution: elucidating the contributions of multiple possible driving forces. European Journal of Inorganic Chemistry, 2019(3-4), pp. 380-386. (doi:10.1002/ejic.201800158)

[img]
Preview
Text
162538.pdf - Published Version
Available under License Creative Commons Attribution Non-commercial No Derivatives.

2MB

Abstract

Incorporating the building blocks of nature (e.g., peptides and DNA) into inorganic polyoxometalate (POM) clusters is a promising approach to improve the compatibilities of POMs in biological fields. To extend their biological applications, it is necessary to understand the importance of different non‐covalent interactions during self‐organization. A series of Anderson POM–peptide hybrids have been used as a simple model to demonstrate the role of different interactions in POM–peptide (biomolecules) systems. Regardless of peptide chain length, these hybrids follow similar solution behaviors, forming hollow, spherical supramolecular structures in acetonitrile/water mixed solvents. The incorporation of peptide tails introduces interesting stimuli‐responsive properties to temperature, hybrid concentration, solvent polarity and ionic strength. Unlike the typical bilayer amphiphilic vesicles, they are found to follow the blackberry‐type assemblies of hydrophilic macroions, which are regulated by electrostatic interaction and hydrogen bonding. The formation of electrostatic assemblies before the supramolecular formation is confirmed by ion‐mobility mass spectrometry (IMS‐MS).

Item Type:Articles
Status:Published
Refereed:Yes
Glasgow Author(s) Enlighten ID:Hutin, Dr Marie and Cronin, Professor Leroy
Authors: Luo, J., Zhang, B., Yvon, C., Hutin, M., Gerislioglu, S., Wesdemiotis, C., Cronin, L., and Liu, T.
College/School:College of Science and Engineering > School of Chemistry
Journal Name:European Journal of Inorganic Chemistry
Publisher:Wiley
ISSN:1434-1948
ISSN (Online):1099-0682
Published Online:14 May 2018
Copyright Holders:Copyright © 2018 The Authors
First Published:First published in European Journal of Inorganic Chemistry 2019(3-4): 380-386
Publisher Policy:Reproduced under a Creative Commons License

University Staff: Request a correction | Enlighten Editors: Update this record

Project CodeAward NoProject NamePrincipal InvestigatorFunder's NameFunder RefLead Dept
577391Programmable Molecular Metal Oxides (PMMOs) - From Fundamentals to ApplicationLeroy CroninEngineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC)EP/J015156/1CHEM - CHEMISTRY
646611Programmable 'Digital' Synthesis for Discovery and Scale-up of Molecules, Clusters and NanomaterialsLeroy CroninEngineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC)EP/L023652/1CHEM - CHEMISTRY
685741SMARTPOM: Artificial-Intelligence Driven Discovery and Synthesis of Polyoxometalate ClustersLeroy CroninEuropean Research Council (ERC)670467CHEM - CHEMISTRY