Participants' experiences of music, mindful music, and audiobook listening interventions for people recovering from stroke

Baylan, S. et al. (2018) Participants' experiences of music, mindful music, and audiobook listening interventions for people recovering from stroke. Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences, (doi:10.1111/nyas.13618) (PMID:29727009) (Early Online Publication)

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Abstract

Existing research evidence suggests that both music listening and mindfulness interventions may have beneficial effects on mood and cognition poststroke. This mixed-methods study, nested within a pilot randomized controlled trial investigating the feasibility and acceptability of combining music listening and brief mindfulness training poststroke, explored study participants' experiences of engaging in the interventions. Fifty-six stroke survivors who were randomized to receive an 8-week intervention of mindful music listening (n = 15), music listening (n = 21), or audiobook listening (n = 20, control) using self-selected material participated in a postintervention individual semistructured interview with a researcher not involved in their intervention delivery. Interview questions focused on affective, cognitive, and physical experiences. Data were coded and analyzed using thematic analysis. Across groups, listening was associated with positive distraction from thoughts and worries. Mindful music listening was most strongly associated with relaxation and concentration, improved attentional control, and emotion regulation, as well as enjoyment. Music listening was most strongly associated with increased activity, memory reminiscence, and improved mood. In addition, participants provided valuable feedback on intervention feasibility and acceptability. The findings suggest that the interventions were feasible and enjoyable for people recovering from stroke.

Item Type:Articles
Keywords:Mindfulness, music, qualitative, rehabilitation, stroke.
Status:Early Online Publication
Refereed:Yes
Glasgow Author(s) Enlighten ID:Easto, Mr Jake and Mercer, Professor Stewart and Evans, Professor Jonathan and Cullen, Dr Breda and Stiles, Ms Ciara and Murray, Mrs Heather and Broomfield, Dr Niall and MacDonald, Miss Maxine and Baylan, Dr Satu and Stott, Professor David J and Quinn, Dr Terence and Haig, Dr Caroline
Authors: Baylan, S., McGinlay, M., MacDonald, M., Easto, J., Cullen, B., Haig, C., Mercer, S., Murray, H., Quinn, T. J., Stott, D. J., Broomfield, N. M., Stiles, C., and Evans, J. J.
College/School:College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > Institute of Cardiovascular and Medical Sciences
College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > Institute of Health and Wellbeing > General Practice and Primary Care
College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > Institute of Health and Wellbeing > Robertson Centre
Journal Name:Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences
Publisher:Wiley
ISSN:0077-8923
ISSN (Online):1749-6632
Published Online:04 May 2018

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Project CodeAward NoProject NamePrincipal InvestigatorFunder's NameFunder RefLead Dept
666301Cognitive outcomes in people with behavioural and brain disorders within UK BiobankBreda CullenChief Scientist office (CSO)DTF/14/03IHW - MENTAL HEALTH & WELLBEING