Telomere elongation during early development is independent of environmental temperatures in Atlantic salmon

McLennan, D., Armstrong, J. D., Stewart, D. C., Mckelvey, S., Boner, W. , Monaghan, P. and Metcalfe, N. B. (2018) Telomere elongation during early development is independent of environmental temperatures in Atlantic salmon. Journal of Experimental Biology, 221, 178616. (doi:10.1242/jeb.178616) (PMID:29636409) (PMCID:PMC6031317)

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Abstract

There is increasing evidence from endothermic vertebrates that telomeres, which cap the ends of chromosomes and play an important role in chromosome protection, decline in length during postnatal life and are a useful indicator of physiological state and expected lifespan. However, much less is currently known about telomere dynamics in ectothermic vertebrates, which are likely to differ from that of endotherms, at least in part due to the sensitivity of ectotherm physiology to environmental temperature. We report here on an experiment in which Atlantic salmon were reared through the embryonic and larval stages of development, and under differing temperatures, in order to examine the effects of environmental temperature during early life on telomere dynamics, oxidative DNA damage and cellular proliferation. Telomere length significantly increased between the embryonic and larval stages of development. Contrary to our expectations, variation in telomere length at the end of the larval stage was unrelated to either cell proliferation rate or the relative level of oxidative DNA damage, and did not vary between the temperature treatments. This study suggests that salmon are able to restore the length of their telomeres during early development, which may possibly help to buffer potentially harmful environmental effects experienced in early life.

Item Type:Articles
Keywords:Cell proliferation, environmental effect, fish, oxidative stress, physiology.
Status:Published
Refereed:Yes
Glasgow Author(s) Enlighten ID:Monaghan, Professor Patricia and Metcalfe, Professor Neil and Boner, Dr Winifred and Mclennan, Mr Darryl
Authors: McLennan, D., Armstrong, J. D., Stewart, D. C., Mckelvey, S., Boner, W., Monaghan, P., and Metcalfe, N. B.
College/School:College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > Institute of Biodiversity Animal Health and Comparative Medicine
Journal Name:Journal of Experimental Biology
Publisher:Company of Biologists
ISSN:0022-0949
ISSN (Online):1477-9145
Published Online:10 April 2018
Copyright Holders:Copyright © 2018 The Authors
First Published:First published in Journal of Experimental Biology 221:178616
Publisher Policy:Reproduced under a Creative Commons License

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Project CodeAward NoProject NamePrincipal InvestigatorFunder's NameFunder RefLead Dept
613121NERC DTG 2012-2016Mary Beth KneafseyNatural Environment Research Council (NERC)NE/K501098/1VPO VICE PRINCIPAL RESEARCH & ENTERPRISE
545091ECOTELO - The ecological significance of telomere dynamics:environments, individuals and inheritancePatricia MonaghanEuropean Research Council (ERC)20100317/FP7-268926RI BIODIVERSITY ANIMAL HEALTH & COMPMED