Serious Digital Games Using Virtual Patients and Digital Chalk-talk Videos: a Novel Approach to Teaching Acute Diabetes Care in the Undergraduate Medical Curriculum

Quail, N., Holmes, K., Linn, A., Rea, P. , Livingstone, D. and Boyle, J. (2018) Serious Digital Games Using Virtual Patients and Digital Chalk-talk Videos: a Novel Approach to Teaching Acute Diabetes Care in the Undergraduate Medical Curriculum. Diabetes UK Professional Conference 2018, London, UK, 14 -16 Mar 2018. (doi:10.1111/dme.33_13571)

Full text not currently available from Enlighten.

Abstract

Aims: Although 10-20% of hospital inpatients have diabetes, confidence levels among junior doctors in diabetes management are low. Approximately half feel that their undergraduate teaching has not prepared them for diabetic emergencies. Serious digital games with virtual patients, incorporating digital chalk-talk video explanations of key concepts, have been developed aiming to increase student engagement, confidence, and knowledge. The scenarios reinforce themes of multi-professional care; multi-morbidity, poly-pharmacy and safe insulin prescribing are frequently encountered by junior doctors but can form part of the hidden undergraduate curriculum. Methods: Three games have been developed using Twine open source software, Wacomb Intuous Pro, Camtasia Studio, Autodesk SketchBook, and simulated patient videos. These address diabetic ketoacidosis, hyperosmolar hyperglycaemic state and severe hypoglycaemia. Students work through the scenarios from presentation to resolution, with integrated chalk-talk explanations for important concepts. A prototype has been piloted with a small cohort of students from senior clinical years. Analysis of this pedagogical approach was performed using the Kirkpatrick model and compared with results from previous years. Results: Our initial pilot has demonstrated high levels of engagement, acceptability and overall satisfaction as well as significant improvements in confidence and knowledge (p<0.05). Conclusion: Acute diabetes care is an important area of the undergraduate curriculum. Our pilot prototype testing suggests that this novel pedagogical approach is acceptable, encourages student engagement, and increases confidence levels and knowledge of acute diabetes care. Further analysis using the Kirkpatrick model will also be performed on a larger student cohort during our flipped classroom ‘Diabetes Acute Care Day.’

Item Type:Conference or Workshop Item
Additional Information:Conference abstract published in Diabetic Medicine 35(S1): 130.
Status:Published
Refereed:Yes
Glasgow Author(s) Enlighten ID:Boyle, Dr James and Linn, Dr Aileen and Rea, Dr Paul
Authors: Quail, N., Holmes, K., Linn, A., Rea, P., Livingstone, D., and Boyle, J.
College/School:College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > School of Life Sciences
College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > School of Medicine, Dentistry & Nursing
Published Online:14 March 2018

University Staff: Request a correction | Enlighten Editors: Update this record