How local cortical processors that maximise coherent variation could lay foundations for representation proper

Phillips, W.A., Kay, J.W. and Smyth, D. (1995) How local cortical processors that maximise coherent variation could lay foundations for representation proper. In: Smith, L.S. and Hancock, P.J.B. (eds.) Neural Computation and Psychology: Proceedings of the 3rd Neural Computation and Psychology Workshop (NCPW3), Stirling, Scotland, 31 August-2 September, 1994. Series: Workshops in computing. Springer-Verlag: London ; New York, pp. 117-133. ISBN 9783540199489 (doi:10.1007/978-1-4471-3579-1_10)

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Abstract

This paper discusses computational capabilities that might be common to local processors in many different cortical regions. It examines the possibility that cortical processors may perform a kind of statistical latent structure analysis that discovers predictive relationships between large and diverse data sets. Information theory is used to show that this goal is formally coherent, and its computational feasibility is investigated by simulating multi-stream networks built from local processors with properties that this goal requires. The hypotheses developed emphasize cooperative population codes and the contextual guidance of learning and processing. Neurobiological and neuropsychological evidence for contextual guidance and cooperative population codes is outlined. The possible relevance of these ideas to the concept of representation proper is discussed.

Item Type:Book Sections
Status:Published
Glasgow Author(s) Enlighten ID:Kay, Dr James
Authors: Phillips, W.A., Kay, J.W., and Smyth, D.
College/School:College of Science and Engineering > School of Mathematics and Statistics > Statistics
Publisher:Springer-Verlag
ISBN:9783540199489

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