Sonic autoethnographies: personal listening as compositional context

Findlay-Walsh, I. (2018) Sonic autoethnographies: personal listening as compositional context. Organised Sound, 23(1), pp. 121-130. (doi: 10.1017/S1355771817000371)

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Abstract

This article discusses a range of self-reflexive tendencies in field recording, soundscape composition and studio production, and explores examples of sonic practices and works in which the personal listening experiences of the composer are a key contextual and compositional element. As broad areas for discussion, particular attention is given to soundscape composition as self-narrative (exploring the representation of the recordist in soundscape works) and to producing the hyperreal and the liminal (considering spatial characteristics of contemporary auditory experience and their consequences for sonic practice). The discussion then focuses on the specific application of autoethnographic research methods to the practice and the understanding of soundscape composition. Compositional strategies employed in two recent pieces by the author are considered in detail. The aim of this discussion is to link autoethnography to specific ideas about sound and listening, and to some tendencies in field recording, soundscape composition and studio production, while also providing context for the discussion of the author’s own practice and works. In drawing together this range of ideas, methods and work, sonic autoethnography is aligned with an emerging discourse around reflexive, embodied sound work.

Item Type:Articles
Status:Published
Refereed:Yes
Glasgow Author(s) Enlighten ID:Findlay-Walsh, Dr Iain
Authors: Findlay-Walsh, I.
College/School:College of Arts > School of Culture and Creative Arts > Music
Journal Name:Organised Sound
Publisher:Cambridge University Press
ISSN:1355-7718
ISSN (Online):1469-8153
Published Online:26 December 2017
Copyright Holders:Copyright © 2018 Cambridge University Press
First Published:First published in Organised Sound 23(1):121-130
Publisher Policy:Reproduced in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher

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