Personal domains assessed in multiple mini interviews (MMIs) for healthcare student selection: A narrative synthesis systematic review

Callwood, A., Jeevaratnam, K., Kotronoulas, G. , Schneider, A., Lewis, L. and Nadarajah, V. D. (2018) Personal domains assessed in multiple mini interviews (MMIs) for healthcare student selection: A narrative synthesis systematic review. Nurse Education Today, 64, pp. 56-64. (doi:10.1016/j.nedt.2018.01.016) (PMID:29459193)

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Abstract

To examine the personal domains multiple mini interviews (MMIs) are being designed to assess, explore how they were determined and contextualise such domains in current and future healthcare student selection processes DESIGN: A systematic review of empirical research reporting on MMI model design was conducted from database inception to November 2017. Twelve electronic bibliographic databases. Evidence was extracted from original studies, and integrated in a narrative synthesis guided by the PRISMA statement for reporting systematic reviews. Personal domains were clustered into themes using a modified Delphi technique. A total of 584 articles were screened. 65 unique studies (80 articles) matched our inclusion criteria of which seven were conducted within nursing/midwifery faculties. Six in 10 studies featured applicants to medical school. Across selection processes, we identified 32 personal domains assessed by MMIs, the most frequent being: communication skills (84%), teamwork/collaboration (70%), and ethical/moral judgement (65%). Domains capturing ability to cope with stressful situations (14%), make decisions (14%), and resolve conflict in the workplace (13%) featured in fewer than ten studies overall. Intra- and inter-disciplinary inconsistencies in domain profiles were noted, as well as differences by entry level. MMIs deployed in nursing and midwifery assessed compassion and decision-making more frequently than in all other disciplines. Own programme philosophy and professional body guidance were most frequently cited (~50%) as sources for personal domains; a blueprinting process was reported in only 8% of studies. Nursing, midwifery and allied healthcare professionals should develop their theoretical frameworks for MMIs to ensure they are evidence-based and fit-for-purpose. We suggest a re-evaluation of domain priorities to ensure that students who are selected, not only have the capacity to offer the highest standards of care provision, but are able to maintain these standards when facing clinical practice and organisational pressures.

Item Type:Articles
Keywords:Attributes, Compassion fatigue, Domains, Health care professional, Multiple mini interviews, Selection
Status:Published
Refereed:Yes
Glasgow Author(s) Enlighten ID:Kotronoulas, Dr Grigorios
Authors: Callwood, A., Jeevaratnam, K., Kotronoulas, G., Schneider, A., Lewis, L., and Nadarajah, V. D.
College/School:College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > School of Medicine, Dentistry & Nursing > Nursing and Health Care
Journal Name:Nurse Education Today
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:0260-6917
ISSN (Online):1532-2793
Published Online:31 January 2018
Copyright Holders:Copyright © 2018 Elsevier
First Published:First published in Nurse Education Today 64:56-64
Publisher Policy:Reproduced in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher

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