Traumatic brain injury: a potential cause of violent crime?

Williams, W. H., Chitsabesan, P., Fazel, S., McMillan, T. , Hughes, N., Parsonage, M. and Tonks, J. (2018) Traumatic brain injury: a potential cause of violent crime? Lancet Psychiatry, 5(10), pp. 836-844. (doi:10.1016/S2215-0366(18)30062-2) (PMID:29496587)

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Abstract

Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is the biggest cause of death and disability in children and young people. TBI compromises important neurological functions for self-regulation and social behaviour and increases risk of behavioural disorder and psychiatric morbidity. Crime in young people is a major social issue. So-called early starters often continue for a lifetime. A substantial majority of young offenders are reconvicted soon after release. Multiple factors play a role in crime. We show how TBI is a risk factor for earlier, more violent, offending. TBI is linked to poor engagement in treatment, in-custody infractions, and reconviction. Schemes to assess and manage TBI are under development. These might improve engagement of offenders in forensic psychotherapeutic rehabilitation and reduce crime.

Item Type:Articles
Additional Information:TM holds grants from the Scottish Government; WHW from the Barrow Cadbury Trust. WHW is also a Vice Chair of the Criminal Justice and Acquired Brain Injury Group. SF is funded by the Wellcome Trust (202836/Z/16/Z). NH is funded by Barrow Cadbury Trust.
Status:Published
Refereed:Yes
Glasgow Author(s) Enlighten ID:McMillan, Professor Thomas
Authors: Williams, W. H., Chitsabesan, P., Fazel, S., McMillan, T., Hughes, N., Parsonage, M., and Tonks, J.
College/School:College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > Institute of Health and Wellbeing > Mental Health and Wellbeing
Journal Name:Lancet Psychiatry
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:2215-0366
ISSN (Online):2215-0374
Published Online:26 February 2018
Copyright Holders:Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd.
First Published:First published in Lancet Psychiatry 5(10): 836-844
Publisher Policy:Reproduced in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher

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