Exposure to liquid sweetness in early childhood: Artificially-sweetened and sugar-sweetened beverage consumption at 4-5 years and risk of overweight and obesity at 7-8 years

Macintyre, A., Marryat, L. and Chambers, S. (2018) Exposure to liquid sweetness in early childhood: Artificially-sweetened and sugar-sweetened beverage consumption at 4-5 years and risk of overweight and obesity at 7-8 years. Pediatric Obesity, 13(12), pp. 755-765. (doi:10.1111/ijpo.12284) (PMID:29624909) (PMCID:PMC6492200)

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Abstract

Background: A significant gap exists in longitudinal evidence on early exposure to artificially sweetened beverages (ASBs) and weight outcomes for paediatric populations. Objective: The objective of this study is to examine the relationship between ASB/sugar‐sweetened beverage (SSB) consumption at 4–5 years and risk of overweight and obesity at 7–8 years. Methods: Data from a nationally representative cohort (n = 2986) in Scotland were analysed using logistic regression to evaluate the association between exposure to ASBs/SSBs at 4–5 years and risk of overweight and obesity at 7–8 years. Results: There were positive unadjusted associations between ASB consumption and risk of obesity, and following adjustment for confounders, ASB associations attenuated, and only the middle consumption category (1 to 6 times per week) remained significant (odds ratio 1.57, 95% confidence interval {CI} 1.05–2.36). For SSB consumption, there were no significant unadjusted associations, and following adjustment for confounders, only the middle consumption category was significant (odds ratio 1.65, 95% CI 1.12–2.44). There were no significant associations for risk of overweight. Conclusions: Longitudinal analysis from 4–5 to 7–8 years demonstrated some evidence of associations between ASBs/SSB consumption and risk of obesity. However, non‐linear patterns and wide CIs suggest cautious interpretation and need for future studies with long‐term follow‐up.

Item Type:Articles
Status:Published
Refereed:Yes
Glasgow Author(s) Enlighten ID:Chambers, Dr Stephanie and Marryat, Dr Louise
Authors: Macintyre, A., Marryat, L., and Chambers, S.
College/School:College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > Institute of Health and Wellbeing > Mental Health and Wellbeing
College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > Institute of Health and Wellbeing > Social Scientists working in Health and Wellbeing
Journal Name:Pediatric Obesity
Publisher:Wiley
ISSN:2047-6302
ISSN (Online):2047-6310
Published Online:06 April 2018
Copyright Holders:Copyright © 2018 The Authors
First Published:First published in Pediatric Obesity 13(12): 755-765
Publisher Policy:Reproduced under a Creative Commons License

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Project CodeAward NoProject NamePrincipal InvestigatorFunder's NameFunder RefLead Dept
620221MRC SPHSU/GU Transfer FellowshipsLaurence MooreMedical Research Council (MRC)MC_PC_13027IHW - MRC/CSO SPHU
727641SPHSU Core Renewal: Setting and Health Improvement Research ProgrammeKathryn HuntMedical Research Council (MRC)MC_UU_12017/12IHW - MRC/CSO SPHU
727661SPHSU Core Renewal: Complexity in Health Improvement Research ProgrammeLaurence MooreMedical Research Council (MRC)MC_UU_12017/14IHW - MRC/CSO SPHU
603761The Scottish eHealth Informatics Research Centre (E-HIRCs)Jill PellMedical Research Council (MRC)MR/K007017/1IHW - PUBLIC HEALTH