Serum levels of advanced glycation end-products (AGEs) and the decoy soluble receptor for AGEs (sRAGE) can discriminate non-alcoholic fatty liver disease in age-, sex- and BMI-matched normo-glycemic adults

Palma-Duran, S. A., Kontogianni, M. D., Vlassopoulos, A., Zhao, S., Margariti, A., Georgoulis, M., Papatheodoridis, G. and Combet, E. (2018) Serum levels of advanced glycation end-products (AGEs) and the decoy soluble receptor for AGEs (sRAGE) can discriminate non-alcoholic fatty liver disease in age-, sex- and BMI-matched normo-glycemic adults. Metabolism, 83, pp. 120-127. (doi:10.1016/j.metabol.2018.01.023) (PMID:29409822)

Palma-Duran, S. A., Kontogianni, M. D., Vlassopoulos, A., Zhao, S., Margariti, A., Georgoulis, M., Papatheodoridis, G. and Combet, E. (2018) Serum levels of advanced glycation end-products (AGEs) and the decoy soluble receptor for AGEs (sRAGE) can discriminate non-alcoholic fatty liver disease in age-, sex- and BMI-matched normo-glycemic adults. Metabolism, 83, pp. 120-127. (doi:10.1016/j.metabol.2018.01.023) (PMID:29409822)

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Abstract

Background: Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a serious health problem affecting ~25% of the global population. While NAFLD pathogenesis is still unclear, multiple NAFLD parameters, including reduced insulin sensitivity, impaired glucose metabolism and increased oxidative stress are hypothesised to foster the formation of advance glycation end-products (AGEs). Given the link of AGEs with end organ damage, there is scope to examine the role of the AGE/RAGE axis activation in liver injury and NAFLD. Methods: Age, sex and body mass index matched normo-glycemic NAFLD adults (n = 58) and healthy controls (n = 58) were enrolled in the study. AGEs were analysed by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (CML, CEL), fluorescence (pentosidine, AGE fluorescence), colorimetry (fructosamine) and ELISA (sRAGE). Their association with liver function, inflammation, fibrosis and stage of NAFLD was examined. Results: Early and advanced glycation end-products, except Nε-carboxymethyl-L-lysine (CML), were 10–30% higher, sRAGE levels 1.7-fold lower, and glycation/sRAGE ratios 4-fold higher in the NAFLD cases compared to controls. While AGEs presented weak to moderate correlations with indices of liver function and damage (AST/ALT, HOMA-IR, TNF-α and TGF-β1), including sRAGE to characterize the AGEs/sRAGE axis strengthened the associations observed. High glycation/sRAGE ratios were associated with 1.3 to 14-fold likelihood of lower AST/ALT ratios. The sum of AGEs/sRAGE ratios accurately distinguished between healthy controls and NAFLD patients (area under the curve of 0.85). Elevated AGEs/sRAGE (>7.8 mmol/pmol) was associated with a 12-fold likelihood of the presence of NAFLD. Conclusion: These findings strengthen the involvement of AGEs-RAGE axis in liver injury and the pathogenesis of NAFLD.

Item Type:Articles
Status:Published
Refereed:Yes
Glasgow Author(s) Enlighten ID:Combet Aspray, Dr Emilie
Authors: Palma-Duran, S. A., Kontogianni, M. D., Vlassopoulos, A., Zhao, S., Margariti, A., Georgoulis, M., Papatheodoridis, G., and Combet, E.
College/School:College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > School of Medicine, Dentistry & Nursing
Journal Name:Metabolism
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:0026-0495
ISSN (Online):1532-8600
Published Online:02 February 2018
Copyright Holders:Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc.
First Published:First published in Metabolism 83: 120-127
Publisher Policy:Reproduced in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher

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