Association between mean systolic and diastolic blood pressure throughout the follow-up and cardiovascular events in acute myocardial infarction patients with systolic dysfunction and/or heart failure: an analysis from the High-Risk Myocardial Infarction Database Initiative

Ferreira, J. P., Duarte, K., Pfeffer, M. A., McMurray, J. J.V. , Pitt, B., Dickstein, K., Zannad, F. and Rossignol, P. (2018) Association between mean systolic and diastolic blood pressure throughout the follow-up and cardiovascular events in acute myocardial infarction patients with systolic dysfunction and/or heart failure: an analysis from the High-Risk Myocardial Infarction Database Initiative. European Journal of Heart Failure, 20(2), pp. 323-331. (doi:10.1002/ejhf.1131) (PMID:29314455)

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Abstract

Background: Observational data have described the association of blood pressure (BP) with mortality as ‘J-shaped’, meaning that mortality rates increase below a certain BP threshold. We aimed to analyse the associations between BP and prognosis in a population of acute myocardial infarction (MI) patients with heart failure (HF) and/or systolic dysfunction. Methods and results: The datasets included in this pooling initiative are derived from four trials: CAPRICORN, EPHESUS, OPTIMAAL, and VALIANT. A total of 28 771 patients were included in this analysis. Arithmetic means of all office BP values measured throughout follow-up were used. The primary outcome was cardiovascular death. The mean age was 65 ± 11.5 years and 30% were female. Patients in the lower systolic BP (SBP) quintiles had higher rates of cardiovascular death (reference: SBP 121–128 mmHg) [adjusted hazard ratio (HR) 2.49, 95% confidence interval (CI) 2.26–2.74 for SBP ≤112 mmHg, and HR 1.29, 95% CI 1.16–1.43 for SBP 113–120 mmHg]. The findings for HF hospitalization and MI were similar. However, stroke rates were higher in patients within the highest SBP quintile (reference: SBP 121–128 mmHg) (HR 1.38, 95% CI 1.11–1.72). Patients who died had a much shorter follow-up (0.7 vs. 2.1 years), less BP measurements (4.6 vs. 9.8) and lower mean BP (–8 mmHg in the last SBP measurement compared with patients who remained alive during the follow-up), suggesting that the associations of low BP and increased cardiovascular death represent a reverse causality phenomenon. Conclusion: Systolic BP values <125 mmHg were associated with increased cardiovascular death, but these findings likely represent a reverse causality phenomenon.

Item Type:Articles
Status:Published
Refereed:Yes
Glasgow Author(s) Enlighten ID:McMurray, Professor John
Authors: Ferreira, J. P., Duarte, K., Pfeffer, M. A., McMurray, J. J.V., Pitt, B., Dickstein, K., Zannad, F., and Rossignol, P.
College/School:College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > Institute of Cardiovascular and Medical Sciences
Journal Name:European Journal of Heart Failure
Publisher:Wiley
ISSN:1388-9842
ISSN (Online):1879-0844
Published Online:04 January 2018
Copyright Holders:Copyright © 2018 The Authors and European Society of Cardiology
First Published:First published in European Journal of Heart Failure 20(2):323-331
Publisher Policy:Reproduced in accordance with the publisher copyright policy

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