Proposed guidelines to evaluate scientific validity and evidence for genotype-based dietary advice

Grimaldi, K. A. et al. (2017) Proposed guidelines to evaluate scientific validity and evidence for genotype-based dietary advice. Genes and Nutrition, 12, 35. (doi: 10.1186/s12263-017-0584-0) (PMID:29270237) (PMCID:PMC5732517)

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Abstract

Nutrigenetic research examines the effects of inter-individual differences in genotype on responses to nutrients and other food components, in the context of health and of nutrient requirements. A practical application of nutrigenetics is the use of personal genetic information to guide recommendations for dietary choices that are more efficacious at the individual or genetic subgroup level relative to generic dietary advice. Nutrigenetics is unregulated, with no defined standards, beyond some commercially adopted codes of practice. Only a few official nutrition-related professional bodies have embraced the subject, and, consequently, there is a lack of educational resources or guidance for implementation of the outcomes of nutrigenetic research. To avoid misuse and to protect the public, personalised nutrigenetic advice and information should be based on clear evidence of validity grounded in a careful and defensible interpretation of outcomes from nutrigenetic research studies. Evidence requirements are clearly stated and assessed within the context of state-of-the-art ‘evidence-based nutrition’. We have developed and present here a draft framework that can be used to assess the strength of the evidence for scientific validity of nutrigenetic knowledge and whether ‘actionable’. In addition, we propose that this framework be used as the basis for developing transparent and scientifically sound advice to the public based on nutrigenetic tests. We feel that although this area is still in its infancy, minimal guidelines are required. Though these guidelines are based on semi-quantitative data, they should stimulate debate on their utility. This framework will be revised biennially, as knowledge on the subject increases.

Item Type:Articles
Additional Information:The Food4Me study was supported by the European Commission under the Food, Agriculture, Fisheries and Biotechnology Theme of the 7th Framework Programme for Research and Technological Development, grant number 265494.
Status:Published
Refereed:Yes
Glasgow Author(s) Enlighten ID:Celis, Dr Carlos
Authors: Grimaldi, K. A., van Ommen, B., Ordovas, J. M., Parnell, L. D., Mathers, J. C., Bendik, I., Brennan, L., Celis-Morales, C., Cirillo, E., Daniel, H., de Kok, B., El-Sohemy, A., Fairweather-Tait, S. J., Fallaize, R., Fenech, M., Ferguson, L. R., Gibney, E. R., Gibney, M., Gjelstad, I. M. F., Kaput, J., Karlsen, A. S., Kolossa, S., Lovegrove, J., Macready, A. L., Marsaux, C. F. M., Alfredo Martinez, J., Milagro, F., Navas-Carretero, S., Roche, H. M., Saris, W. H. M., Traczyk, I., van Kranen, H., Verschuren, L., Virgili, F., Weber, P., and Bouwman, J.
College/School:College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > Institute of Cardiovascular and Medical Sciences
Journal Name:Genes and Nutrition
Publisher:Springer
ISSN:1555-8932
ISSN (Online):1865-3499
Copyright Holders:Copyright © 2017 The Authors
First Published:First published in Genes and Nutrition, 2017
Publisher Policy:Reproduced under a Creative Commons License

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