Understanding the prevalence and drivers of food bank use: evidence from deprived communities in Glasgow

MacLeod, M. A., Curl, A. and Kearns, A. (2018) Understanding the prevalence and drivers of food bank use: evidence from deprived communities in Glasgow. Social Policy and Society, (doi:10.1017/S1474746418000064) (Early Online Publication)

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Abstract

This article provides quantitative analysis of a self-reported measure of food bank use in the UK, adding to a sparse evidence base. Evidence from fifteen deprived communities in Glasgow is used to examine the scale of food bank use and to consider its relationship with socio-demographic, health, and financial variables. Being affected by welfare reforms was found to increase the likelihood of food bank use. Young men and those with mental health problems were found to be more likely than others to have used a food bank. Food banks appear to be used by groups who are being under-served by the welfare state and suffering the most acute impacts of austerity. The very low prevalence of food bank use among those who struggle to afford food points to their inadequacy as a response to food insecurity.

Item Type:Articles
Status:Early Online Publication
Refereed:Yes
Glasgow Author(s) Enlighten ID:Curl, Dr Angela and Kearns, Professor Ade and Macleod, Mary Anne
Authors: MacLeod, M. A., Curl, A., and Kearns, A.
College/School:College of Social Sciences > School of Social and Political Sciences > Urban Studies
College of Social Sciences > School of Social and Political Sciences
Journal Name:Social Policy and Society
Publisher:Cambridge University Press
ISSN:1474-7464
ISSN (Online):1475-3073
Published Online:15 March 2018
Copyright Holders:Copyright © 2018 Cambridge University Press
First Published:First published in Social Policy and Society 2018
Publisher Policy:Reproduced in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher

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