Changes in metabolic parameters in patients with severe mental illness over a 10-year period: A retrospective cohort study

Heald, A. H., Martin, J. L. , Payton, T., Khalid, L., Anderson, S. G., Narayanan, R. P., De Hert, M., Yung, A. and Livingston, M. (2017) Changes in metabolic parameters in patients with severe mental illness over a 10-year period: A retrospective cohort study. Australian and New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry, 51(1), pp. 75-82. (doi:10.1177/0004867415625817) (PMID:26769981)

Heald, A. H., Martin, J. L. , Payton, T., Khalid, L., Anderson, S. G., Narayanan, R. P., De Hert, M., Yung, A. and Livingston, M. (2017) Changes in metabolic parameters in patients with severe mental illness over a 10-year period: A retrospective cohort study. Australian and New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry, 51(1), pp. 75-82. (doi:10.1177/0004867415625817) (PMID:26769981)

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Abstract

Background: Diabetes, obesity and metabolic syndrome are highly prevalent in patients with severe mental illness and can impose a major physical health burden. Objective: To determine how anthropometric and metabolic features changed over time in a retrospective cohort of people with Severe Mental Illness living in Cheshire, UK. Methods: In all, 1307 individuals on the severe mental illness Register were followed up between 2002 and 2012 in UK general practice. Subjects were identified through a pseudanonymised search of general practice registers. Results: Baseline body mass index was 28.6 kg/m2 increasing to 31.0 at 10-year follow-up (r2 = 0.84; p = 0.0002). There was a significant increase in fasting blood glucose from 5.72 to 6.79 mmol/L (r2 = 0.48; p = 0.026). Correspondingly, there was a strong positive univariate relation between increase in body mass index and fasting blood glucose (r2 = 0.54; p < 0.0001) taking into account all measurements. Fasting blood glucose also increased slightly with age (p = 0.028). With increasing use of statins, total cholesterol fell from 4.5 to 3.9 mmol/L (r2 = 0.88; p = 0.0001), as did low-density lipoprotein cholesterol from 3.43 to 2.35 mmol/L (r2 = 0.94; p = 0.0001). In multivariate models, adjusting for age, gender, smoking and blood pressure, each unit increase in body mass index (odds ratio = 1.07 [1.01, 1.13]; p = 0.031) and triglycerides (odds ratio = 1.28 (1.06, 1.55); p = 0.009) was independently associated with an increased risk of having type 2 diabetes. Conclusion: Increasing body mass index relates to increasing rates of dysglycaemia over time. Measures to encourage weight reduction should be key strategies to reduce dysglycaemia rates in severe mental illness. Prescribing statins may have been effective in improving the lipid profile in this group.

Item Type:Articles
Keywords:Psychiatry and Mental health, General Medicine
Status:Published
Refereed:Yes
Glasgow Author(s) Enlighten ID:Langan-Martin, Dr Julie
Authors: Heald, A. H., Martin, J. L., Payton, T., Khalid, L., Anderson, S. G., Narayanan, R. P., De Hert, M., Yung, A., and Livingston, M.
College/School:College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > Institute of Health and Wellbeing > Mental Health and Wellbeing
Journal Name:Australian and New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry
Publisher:The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists
ISSN:0004-8674
ISSN (Online):1440-1614
Published Online:14 January 2016

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