Parentally acquired differences in resource acquisition ability between brown trout from alternative life history parentage

Hughes, M. R., Van Leeuwen, T. E., Cunningham, P. D. and Adams, C. E. (2018) Parentally acquired differences in resource acquisition ability between brown trout from alternative life history parentage. Ecology of Freshwater Fish, 27(1), pp. 62-69. (doi:10.1111/eff.12323)

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Abstract

Dominance hierarchies, where they exist, affect individual food acquisition ability and fitness, both of which have the potential to influence life history pathways. Juvenile salmonids exhibit clear dominance hierarchies in early life. As one of the drivers for the adoption of alternative life histories in salmonids is the relative rate of resource acquisition, there is potential for juvenile behaviour to influence the subsequent life history strategy of the individual. Lacustrine brown trout, Salmo trutta, exhibit a multitude of life histories which includes among others the piscivorous (ferox) life history where individuals grow to large size and have delayed maturity and benthivorous and pelagic life histories where individuals grow to much smaller sizes, however mature earlier. Using a number of observable characteristics of dominance, this study compared differences in behaviour between size-matched pairs of progeny, reared under common garden conditions which are derived from alternative, co-existing life history strategy parents. We found that first-generation progeny of ferox trout were more aggressive, acquired more food, had lighter skin pigmentation and held more desirable positions than the progeny of benthivorous brown trout in an experimental stream system. Ferox trout progeny were dominant over benthivorous brown trout progeny in 90% of trials in dyadic contests. Given such clear differences in dominance, this study indicates that parentally acquired dominance-related differences, passed through either, or both, of genetic and nongenetic (e.g. maternal effects) means, are likely a contributing factor to the continued maintenance of distinct life history strategies of brown trout.

Item Type:Articles
Keywords:Ecology, Aquatic Science, Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics
Status:Published
Refereed:Yes
Glasgow Author(s) Enlighten ID:HUGHES, Martin and Adams, Professor Colin and Van Leeuwen, Dr Travis
Authors: Hughes, M. R., Van Leeuwen, T. E., Cunningham, P. D., and Adams, C. E.
College/School:College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > Institute of Biodiversity Animal Health and Comparative Medicine
Journal Name:Ecology of Freshwater Fish
Publisher:Wiley
ISSN:0906-6691
ISSN (Online):1600-0633
Published Online:28 November 2016

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