Positive association between sugar consumption and dental decay prevalence independent of oral hygiene in pre-school children: a longitudinal prospective study

Skafida, V. and Chambers, S. (2018) Positive association between sugar consumption and dental decay prevalence independent of oral hygiene in pre-school children: a longitudinal prospective study. Journal of Public Health, 40(3), e275-e283. (doi:10.1093/pubmed/fdx184) (PMID:29301042) (PMCID:PMC6166585) (Early Online Publication)

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Abstract

Background: Few studies explore how the longitudinal cumulative and combined effects of dietary habits and oral hygiene habits relate to dental decay in very young children. Methods: Using longitudinal survey data, logistic regression models were specified to predict dental decay by age 5. Predictor variables included questions on diet and oral hygiene from ages 2 to 5. Results: Compared to mainly eating meals, children who snacked all day but had no real meals had a higher chance of dental decay (odds ratios (OR) = 2.32). There was an incremental association between a decreasing frequency of toothbrushing at age 2 and higher chances of dental decay at age 5 (OR range from 1.39 to 2.17). Among children eating sweets or chocolate more frequently (once/day or more), toothbrushing more often (once/day; twice/day or more) reduced the chance of decay (OR of 2.11–2.26 compared to OR 3.60 for the least frequent brushing group). Compared to mothers in managerial and professional occupations, those who had never worked had children with a much higher chance of decay (OR = 3.47). Conclusion: This study has shown that toothbrushing can only in part attenuate the association between snacking and long term sugar consumption on dental decay outcomes in children under 5.

Item Type:Articles
Status:Early Online Publication
Refereed:Yes
Glasgow Author(s) Enlighten ID:Chambers, Dr Stephanie
Authors: Skafida, V., and Chambers, S.
College/School:College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > Institute of Health and Wellbeing > Social Scientists working in Health and Wellbeing
Journal Name:Journal of Public Health
Publisher:Oxford University Press
ISSN:1741-3842
ISSN (Online):1741-3850
Published Online:29 December 2017
Copyright Holders:Copyright © 2017 The Authors
First Published:First published in Journal of Public Health 40(3): e275-e253
Publisher Policy:Reproduced under a Creative Commons License

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Project CodeAward NoProject NamePrincipal InvestigatorFunder's NameFunder RefLead Dept
727641SPHSU Core Renewal: Setting and Health Improvement Research ProgrammeKathryn HuntMedical Research Council (MRC)MC_UU_12017/12IHW - MRC/CSO SPHU
727661SPHSU Core Renewal: Complexity in Health Improvement Research ProgrammeLaurence MooreMedical Research Council (MRC)MC_UU_12017/14IHW - MRC/CSO SPHU
620221MRC SPHSU/GU Transfer FellowshipsLaurence MooreMedical Research Council (MRC)MC_PC_13027IHW - MRC/CSO SPHU