Effectiveness of mass media campaigns to reduce alcohol consumption and harm: a systematic review

Young, B. et al. (2018) Effectiveness of mass media campaigns to reduce alcohol consumption and harm: a systematic review. Alcohol and Alcoholism, 53(3), pp. 302-316. (doi:10.1093/alcalc/agx094) (PMID:29329359) (PMCID:PMC5913684)

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Abstract

Aims: To assess the effectiveness of mass media messages to reduce alcohol consumption and related harms using a systematic literature review. Methods: Eight databases were searched along with reference lists of eligible studies. Studies of any design in any country were included, provided that they evaluated a mass media intervention targeting alcohol consumption or related behavioural, social cognitive or clinical outcomes. Drink driving interventions and college campus campaigns were ineligible. Studies quality were assessed, data were extracted and a narrative synthesis conducted. Results: Searches produced 10,212 results and 24 studies were included in the review. Most campaigns used TV or radio in combination with other media channels were conducted in developed countries and were of weak quality. There was little evidence of reductions in alcohol consumption associated with exposure to campaigns based on 13 studies which measured consumption, although most did not state this as a specific aim of the campaign. There were some increases in treatment seeking and information seeking and mixed evidence of changes in intentions, motivation, beliefs and attitudes about alcohol. Campaigns were associated with increases in knowledge about alcohol consumption, especially where levels had initially been low. Recall of campaigns was high. Conclusion: Mass media health campaigns about alcohol are often recalled by individuals, have achieved changes in knowledge, attitudes and beliefs about alcohol but there is little evidence of reductions in alcohol consumption. Short summary: There is little evidence that mass media campaigns have reduced alcohol consumption although most did not state that they aimed to do so. Studies show recall of campaigns is high and that they can have an impact on knowledge, attitudes and beliefs about alcohol consumption.

Item Type:Articles
Status:Published
Refereed:Yes
Glasgow Author(s) Enlighten ID:Hilton, Professor Shona and Campbell, Ms Mhairi and Katikireddi, Dr Vittal
Authors: Young, B., Lewis, S., Katikireddi, S. V., Bauld, L., Stead, M., Angus, K., Campbell, M., Hilton, S., Thomas, J., Hinds, K., Ashie, A., and Langley, T.
College/School:College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > Institute of Health and Wellbeing > MRC/CSO SPHSU
Journal Name:Alcohol and Alcoholism
Publisher:Oxford University Press
ISSN:0735-0414
ISSN (Online):1464-3502
Published Online:10 January 2018
Copyright Holders:Copyright © 2018 The Authors
First Published:First published in Alcohol and Alcoholism 53(3):302-316
Publisher Policy:Reproduced under a Creative Commons License

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Project CodeAward NoProject NamePrincipal InvestigatorFunder's NameFunder RefLead Dept
670181Mass media for public health messagesShona HiltonNational Institute for Health Research (NIHR)13/163/17IHW - MRC/CSO SPHU
699162Understanding the impacts of welfare policy on health: A novel data linkage studySrinivasa KatikireddiChief Scientist office (CSO)SCAF/15/02IHW - MRC/CSO SPHU
727651SPHSU Core Renewal: Measuring and Analysing Socioeconomic Inequalities in Health Research ProgrammeAlastair LeylandMedical Research Council (MRC)MC_UU_12017/13IHW - MRC/CSO SPHU
727671SPHSU Core Renewal: Informing Healthy Public Policy Research ProgrammePeter CraigMedical Research Council (MRC)MC_UU_12017/15IHW - MRC/CSO SPHU