Preferential host switching by primate lentiviruses can account for phylogenetic similarity with the primate phylogeny

Charleston, M.A. and Robertson, D.L. (2002) Preferential host switching by primate lentiviruses can account for phylogenetic similarity with the primate phylogeny. Systematic Biology, 51(3), pp. 528-535. (doi:10.1080/10635150290069940) (PMID:12079649)

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Abstract

Primate lentiviruses (PLV) from closely related primate species have been observed to be more closely related to each other than to PLV from more distantly related primate species. The current explanation for this observation is the codivergence hypothesis; that is, the divergence of a virus lineage results from the divergence of the host lineage. We show that, alternatively, frequent cross-species transmission of PLV, coupled with a tendency for more closely related primate species to exchange viruses "successfully," can result in apparent codivergence. This host-switching hypothesis reconciles several puzzling observations related to the evolution of PLV.

Item Type:Articles
Status:Published
Refereed:Yes
Glasgow Author(s) Enlighten ID:Robertson, Professor David
Authors: Charleston, M.A., and Robertson, D.L.
College/School:College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > Institute of Infection Immunity and Inflammation
Journal Name:Systematic Biology
Publisher:Oxford University Press
ISSN:1063-5157
ISSN (Online):1076-836X

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