Phylogenetic characteristics of three new HIV-1 N strains and implications for the origin of group N

Roques, P., Robertson, D. L. , Souquière, S., Apetrei, C., Nerrienet, E., Barré-Sinoussi, F., Müller-Trutwin, M. and Simon, F. (2004) Phylogenetic characteristics of three new HIV-1 N strains and implications for the origin of group N. AIDS, 18(10), pp. 1371-1381. (doi:10.1097/01.aids.0000125990.86904.28) (PMID:15199313)

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Abstract

Background: The three divergent HIV-1 groups M, N and O were very probably introduced into the human population by independent cross-species transmissions of SIVcpz from the chimpanzee subspecies Pan troglodytes troglodytes in central Africa. Objective: To characterize HIV-1 group N strains and to elucidate the group's epidemiology and relationship to HIV-1 strains O and M, and SIVcpz. Methods: DNA amplification, sequencing and phylogenetic analyses were performed to characterize viruses from three group N-infected individuals (YBF106, YBF115 and YBF116) together with YBF30 and YBF105 previously described. Results: Full-length genome sequence was determined for virus YBF106; gag, pol and env sequences were obtained for YBF116; pol (integrase) and env (gp41) fragments were obtained for YBF115. The gag, pol, 5'-vif and nef sequences were phylogenetically more closely related to HIV-1 M while 3'-vif, vpr, tat, vpu and env clustered with SIVcpz from P. t. troglodytes. Sequence analysis revealed no mutations potentially responsible for drug resistance. Conclusions: The finding that all group N viruses displayed the same recombinant structure and were monophyletic indicates that a single transfer event of SIVcpz to humans can account for the origin of this group. Despite the pathogenic outcome of the known group N infections, the extremely low prevalence of this divergent HIV-1 suggests that this group is not an emerging threat to human health at the present time. However, continuous monitoring of HIV-1 diversity will be important to survey the potential of unusual HIV infections, such as group N, to contribute to the HIV/AIDS pandemic.

Item Type:Articles
Status:Published
Refereed:Yes
Glasgow Author(s) Enlighten ID:Robertson, Professor David
Authors: Roques, P., Robertson, D. L., Souquière, S., Apetrei, C., Nerrienet, E., Barré-Sinoussi, F., Müller-Trutwin, M., and Simon, F.
College/School:College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > Institute of Infection Immunity and Inflammation
Journal Name:AIDS
Publisher:Lippincott, Williams and Wilkins
ISSN:0269-9370
ISSN (Online):1473-5571

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