Effects of breaking up sedentary time with "chair squats" on postprandial metabolism

Hawari, N. S.A., Wilson, J. and Gill, J. M.R. (2018) Effects of breaking up sedentary time with "chair squats" on postprandial metabolism. Journal of Sports Sciences, (doi:10.1080/02640414.2018.1500856) (PMID:30058957) (Early Online Publication)

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Abstract

Prolonged sitting induces adverse metabolic changes. We aimed to determine whether breaking up prolonged sedentary time with short periods of repeated sit-to-stand transitions (“chair squats”) every 20 minutes influences postprandial metabolic responses. Fourteen participants (11 men, 3 women), age 37 ± 16 years, BMI 30.5 ± 3.8 kg.m−2 (mean ± SD) each participated in two experimental trials in random order, in which they arrived fasted, then consumed a test breakfast (8 kcal.kg−1 body weight, 37% energy from fat, 49% carbohydrates, 14% protein) and, 3.5 hours later, an identical test lunch. Expired air and blood samples were taken fasted and for 6.5 hours postprandially. In one trial (SIT) participants sat continuously throughout the observation period; in the “Chair squat” trial (SIT/STAND), participants performed “chair squats” (10 × standing and sitting over 30 seconds, every 20 minutes). Compared to SIT, energy expenditure was 409.7 ± 41.6 kJ (16.6 ± 1.7%) higher in SIT/STAND (p < 0.0001). Postprandial insulin concentrations over the post-breakfast period were 10.9 ± 8.4% lower in SIT/STAND than SIT (p = 0.047), but did not differ between trials in the post-lunch period. Glucose and triglyceride concentrations did not differ significantly between trials. These data demonstrate that a simple, unobtrusive intervention to break up sedentary time can induce some favourable metabolic changes.

Item Type:Articles
Additional Information:NSAH was supported by a Scholarship from the Government of Saudi Arabia.
Status:Early Online Publication
Refereed:Yes
Glasgow Author(s) Enlighten ID:Hawari, Nabeha Saleh A and Gill, Professor Jason and Wilson, Mr John
Authors: Hawari, N. S.A., Wilson, J., and Gill, J. M.R.
College/School:College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > Institute of Cardiovascular and Medical Sciences
Journal Name:Journal of Sports Sciences
Publisher:Taylor & Francis
ISSN:0264-0414
ISSN (Online):1466-447X
Published Online:30 July 2018
Copyright Holders:Copyright © 2018 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor and Francis Group
First Published:First published in Journal of Sports Sciences 2018
Publisher Policy:Reproduced in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher

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