The effects of multi-component weight management interventions on weight loss in adults with intellectual disabilities and obesity: a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials

Harris, L., Melville, C. , Murray, H. and Hankey, C. (2018) The effects of multi-component weight management interventions on weight loss in adults with intellectual disabilities and obesity: a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials. Research in Developmental Disabilities, 72, pp. 42-55. (doi:10.1016/j.ridd.2017.10.021) (PMID:29107176)

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Abstract

Background: Adults with intellectual disabilities have been shown to experience higher rates of obesity in comparison to the general population. Aim: To examine the effectiveness of randomised controlled trials of multi-component weight management interventions for adults with intellectual disabilities and overweight/obesity. Methods and procedures: A systematic search of six electronic databases was conducted from database inception to January 2016. Risk of bias was assessed by the Cochrane Collaboration tool. Behavioural change techniques were defined by coding against the Coventry Aberdeen LOndon REfined (CALO-RE) taxonomy. Meta-analyses were conducted as Weighted Mean Difference (WMD) between intervention and control/comparator intervention. Outcomes and results: Six randomised controlled trials were included. The interventions did not adhere to clinical recommendations [the inclusion of an energy deficit diet (EDD), physical activity, and behaviour change techniques]. Meta-analysis revealed that current multi-component weight management interventions are not more effective than no treatment (WMD: −0.38 kg; 95% CI −1.34 kg to 0.58 kg; p = 0.44). Conclusion and implications: There is a paucity of randomised controlled trials of multi-component weight management interventions for adults with intellectual disabilities and overweight/ obesity. Current interventions, based on a health education approach are ineffective. Future longterm interventions that include an EDD and adhere to clinical recommendations on the management of obesity are warranted.

Item Type:Articles
Additional Information:This study is funded by the Scottish Government—Equally Well Fund.
Keywords:Intellectual disabilities, meta-analysis, multi-component weight management intervention, obesity, weight loss.
Status:Published
Refereed:Yes
Glasgow Author(s) Enlighten ID:Harris, Dr Leanne and Murray, Mrs Heather and Hankey, Dr Catherine and Melville, Professor Craig
Authors: Harris, L., Melville, C., Murray, H., and Hankey, C.
College/School:College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > Institute of Health and Wellbeing > Mental Health and Wellbeing
College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > Institute of Health and Wellbeing > Robertson Centre
College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > School of Medicine, Dentistry & Nursing
Journal Name:Research in Developmental Disabilities
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:0891-4222
ISSN (Online):1873-3379
Published Online:05 November 2017
Copyright Holders:Copyright © 2017 Elsevier, Ltd.
First Published:First published in Research in Developmental Disabilities 72:42-55
Publisher Policy:Reproduced in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher.

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