Feasibility of a real-time self-monitoring device for sitting less and moving more: a randomised controlled trial

Martin, A. , Adams, J. M., Bunn, C. , Gill, J. M.R. , Gray, C. M. , Hunt, K. , Maxwell, D. J., van der Ploeg, H. P., Wyke, S. and Mutrie, N. (2017) Feasibility of a real-time self-monitoring device for sitting less and moving more: a randomised controlled trial. BMJ Open Sport and Exercise Medicine, 3(1), e000285. (doi:10.1136/bmjsem-2017-000285) (PMID:29081985) (PMCID:PMC5652617)

[img]
Preview
Text
148937.pdf - Published Version
Available under License Creative Commons Attribution.

625kB

Abstract

Objectives: Time spent inactive and sedentary are both associated with poor health. Self-monitoring of walking, using pedometers for real-time feedback, is effective at increasing physical activity. The aim of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of a new pocket-worn sedentary time and physical activity real-time self-monitoring device (SitFIT™). Methods: Forty sedentary men were equally randomized into two intervention groups. For four weeks, one group received a SitFIT™ providing feedback on steps and time spent sedentary (lying/sitting); the other group received a SitFIT™ providing feedback on steps and time spent upright (standing/stepping). Change in sedentary time, standing time, stepping time and step count was assessed using activPAL™ monitors at baseline, and 4-week (T1) and 12-week (T2) follow-up. Semi-structured interviews were conducted after 4 and 12 weeks. Results: The SitFIT™ was reported as acceptable and usable, and seen as a helpful and motivating tool to reduce sedentary time by both groups. On average, participants reduced their sedentary time by 7.8 minutes/day (95%CI -55.4, 39.7) (T1) and by 8.2 minutes/day (95%CI -60.1, 44.3) (T2). They increased standing time by 23.2 minutes/day (95%CI 4.0, 42.5) (T1) and 16.2 minutes/day (95%CI -13.9, 46.2) (T2). Stepping time was increased by 8.5 minutes/day (95%CI 0.9, 16.0) (T1) and 9.0 minutes/day (95%CI 0.5, 17.5) (T2). There were no between-group differences at either follow-up time points. Conclusion: The SitFIT™ was perceived as a useful tool for self-monitoring of sedentary time. It has potential to be used as a real-time self-monitoring device to reduce sedentary and increase upright time.

Item Type:Articles
Status:Published
Refereed:Yes
Glasgow Author(s) Enlighten ID:Wyke, Professor Sally and Gray, Dr Lucinda and Martin, Dr Anne and Hunt, Professor Kathryn and Gill, Professor Jason and Bunn, Dr Christopher
Authors: Martin, A., Adams, J. M., Bunn, C., Gill, J. M.R., Gray, C. M., Hunt, K., Maxwell, D. J., van der Ploeg, H. P., Wyke, S., and Mutrie, N.
Subjects:H Social Sciences > H Social Sciences (General)
R Medicine > RA Public aspects of medicine > RA0421 Public health. Hygiene. Preventive Medicine
College/School:College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > Institute of Cardiovascular and Medical Sciences
College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > Institute of Health and Wellbeing > MRC/CSO Unit
College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > Institute of Health and Wellbeing > Social Scientists working in Health and Wellbeing
Journal Name:BMJ Open Sport and Exercise Medicine
Publisher:BMJ Publishing Group
ISSN:2055-7647
ISSN (Online):2055-7647
Published Online:11 October 2017
Copyright Holders:Copyright © 2017 The Authors
First Published:First published in BMJ Open Sport and Exercise Medicine 3(1):e000285
Publisher Policy:Reproduced under a Creative Commons License

University Staff: Request a correction | Enlighten Editors: Update this record

Project CodeAward NoProject NamePrincipal InvestigatorFunder's NameFunder RefLead Dept
630851EUROFIT: Social innovation to improve physical activity and sedentary behaviour through elite European footballSally WykeEuropean Commission (EC)602170SPS - INST. OF HEALTH & WELLBEING
727641SPHSU Core Renewal: Setting and Health Improvement Research ProgrammeKathryn HuntMedical Research Council (MRC)MC_UU_12017/12IHW - MRC/CSO SPHU