Metacognitive beliefs as psychological predictors of social functioning: an investigation with young people at risk of psychosis

Bright, M., Parker, S., French, P., Fowler, D., Gumley, A. , Morrison, A. P., Birchwood, M., Jones, P. B., Stewart, S. L.K. and Wells, A. (2018) Metacognitive beliefs as psychological predictors of social functioning: an investigation with young people at risk of psychosis. Psychiatry Research, 262, pp. 520-526. (doi:10.1016/j.psychres.2017.09.037) (PMID:28942953) (PMCID:PMC5884305)

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Abstract

Poor social functioning has been found to be present in those at risk for psychosis. This study aimed to examine metacognitive beliefs as potential predictors of structured activity (measure of social functioning) in those with an At Risk Mental State (ARMS). Regression and correlation analyses were conducted. The sample included 109 young people. Age was found to be positively correlated to structured activity. Metacognitive beliefs concerning uncontrollability and danger of worry were found to negatively predict structured activity. This was after controlling for age, gender, treatment allocation, cognitive schemas, positive symptom severity, social anxiety, and depression. Metacognitive danger items were most important. Age was the only control variable found to be an independent predictor of structured activity in the regression model, despite negative bi-variate relationships with structured activity found across three cognitive schema subscales and social anxiety. This is the first study to find that higher negative metacognitive beliefs about uncontrollability and danger predict lower social functioning in an ARMS sample, and that the perception of thoughts being dangerous was of particular importance. Psychological interventions should consider targeting this metacognitive dimension to increase social functioning. Future longitudinal research is required to strengthen findings in this area.

Item Type:Articles
Status:Published
Refereed:Yes
Glasgow Author(s) Enlighten ID:Gumley, Professor Andrew
Authors: Bright, M., Parker, S., French, P., Fowler, D., Gumley, A., Morrison, A. P., Birchwood, M., Jones, P. B., Stewart, S. L.K., and Wells, A.
College/School:College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > Institute of Health and Wellbeing > Mental Health and Wellbeing
Journal Name:Psychiatry Research
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:0165-1781
ISSN (Online):1872-7123
Published Online:14 September 2017
Copyright Holders:Copyright © 2017 The Authors
First Published:First published in Psychiatry Research 262: 520-526
Publisher Policy:Reproduced under a Creative Commons License

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Project CodeAward NoProject NamePrincipal InvestigatorFunder's NameFunder RefLead Dept
423761Early detection and psychological intervention for individuals at high risk of psychosisAndrew GumleyMedical Research Council (MRC)G0500264/73571IHW - MENTAL HEALTH & WELLBEING