Nonandrogenic anabolic hormones predict risk of frailty: European male ageing study prospective data

Swiecicka, A. et al. (2017) Nonandrogenic anabolic hormones predict risk of frailty: European male ageing study prospective data. Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism, 102(8), pp. 2798-2806. (doi:10.1210/jc.2017-00090) (PMID:28609827)

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Abstract

Context: Low levels of nonandrogenic anabolic hormones have been linked with frailty, but evidence is conflicting and prospective data are largely lacking. Objective: To determine associations between nonandrogenic anabolic hormones and prospective changes in frailty status. Design/Setting: A 4.3-year prospective observational study of community-dwelling men participating in the European Male Ageing Study. Participants: Men (n = 3369) aged 40 to 79 years from eight European centers. Main Outcome Measures: Frailty status was determined using frailty phenotype (FP; n = 2114) and frailty index (FI; n = 2444). Analysis: Regression models assessed relationships between baseline levels of insulinlike growth factor 1 (IGF-1), its binding protein 3 (IGFBP-3), dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEA-S), 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25OHD), and parathyroid hormone (PTH), with changes in frailty status (worsening or improving frailty). Results: The risk of worsening FP and FI decreased with 1 standard deviation higher IGF-1, IGFBP-3, and 25OHD in models adjusted for age, body mass index, center, and baseline frailty [IGF-1: odds ratio (OR) for worsening FP, 0.82 (0.73, 0.93), percentage change in FI, −3.7% (−6.0, −1.5); IGFBP-3: 0.84 (0.75, 0.95), −4.2% (−6.4, −2.0); 25OHD: 0.84 (0.75, 0.95); −4.4%, (−6.7, −2.0)]. Relationships between IGF-1 and FI were attenuated after adjusting for IGFBP-3. Higher DHEA-S was associated with a lower risk of worsening FP only in men >70 years old [OR, 0.57 (0.35, 0.92)]. PTH was unrelated to change in frailty status. Conclusions: These longitudinal data confirm the associations between nonandrogenic anabolic hormones and the changes in frailty status. Interventional studies are needed to establish causality and determine therapeutic implications.

Item Type:Articles
Status:Published
Refereed:Yes
Glasgow Author(s) Enlighten ID:Lean, Professor Michael
Authors: Swiecicka, A., Lunt, M., Ahern, T., O’Neill, T. W., Bartfai, G., Casanueva, F. F., Forti, G., Giwercman, A., Han, T. S., Lean, M. E.J., Pendleton, N., Punab, M., Slowikowska-Hilczer, J., Vanderschueren, D., Huhtaniemi, I. T., Wu, F. C. W., and Rutter, M. K.
College/School:College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > School of Medicine, Dentistry & Nursing
Journal Name:Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism
Publisher:Oxford University Press
ISSN:0021-972X
ISSN (Online):1945-7197
Published Online:09 May 2017
Copyright Holders:Copyright © 2017 The Authors
First Published:First published in Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism 102(8):2798-2806
Publisher Policy:Reproduced under a Creative Commons License

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