Investigating a ‘Glasgow Effect’: Why do equally deprived UK cities experience different health outcomes?

Walsh, D. , Bendel, N., Jones, R. and Hanlon, P. (2010) Investigating a ‘Glasgow Effect’: Why do equally deprived UK cities experience different health outcomes? Project Report. Glasgow Centre for Population Health, Glasgow.

Full text not currently available from Enlighten.

Publisher's URL: http://www.gcph.co.uk/publications/61

Abstract

This report presents the results of the first of two phases of research aimed at gaining a better understanding of what lies behind the so-called 'Glasgow Effect', a term increasingly used in recent years to describe the poor health status of Glasgow over and above that attributable to the city's high levels of socio-economic deprivation. This study had two complementary objectives: To establish whether there is evidence of a 'Glasgow Effect', even when Glasgow is compared to its two most similar and comparable UK cities, and when based on a more robust and spatially sensitive measure of deprivation that has previously been available to researchers. To develop data that facilitate the identification of comparable small areas within the three cities as a focus for a second, qualitative, piece of research: specifically, to identify communities in Glasgow which experience significantly different health outcomes comapred to similarly deprived communities in Liverpool and Manchester.

Item Type:Research Reports or Papers (Project Report)
Status:Published
Glasgow Author(s) Enlighten ID:Hanlon, Professor Philip and Walsh, Dr David
Authors: Walsh, D., Bendel, N., Jones, R., and Hanlon, P.
College/School:College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > Institute of Health and Wellbeing > Public Health
Publisher:Glasgow Centre for Population Health

University Staff: Request a correction | Enlighten Editors: Update this record