Number of offspring and cardiovascular disease risk in men and women: the role of shared lifestyle characteristics

Magnus, M. C., Iliodromiti, S., Lawlor, D. A., Catov, J. M., Nelson, S. M. and Fraser, A. (2017) Number of offspring and cardiovascular disease risk in men and women: the role of shared lifestyle characteristics. Epidemiology, 28(6), pp. 880-888. (doi:10.1097/EDE.0000000000000712) (PMID:28696997) (PMCID:PMC5625954)

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Abstract

Previous studies of the number of offspring and cardiovascular disease (CVD) report conflicting findings. We re-examined this association in both sexes to clarify the role of the cardiometabolic changes that women experience during pregnancy versus shared lifestyle characteristics. We studied 180,626 women and 133,259 men participating in the UK Biobank cohort who were free of CVD at baseline. CVD events were obtained from hospital and death registers. Analyses were conducted using Cox proportional hazards regression. The incidence rates of overall CVD were 6 per 1,000 person years for women and 9 per 1,000 person years for men. Number of children showed an association with risk of CVD among women; the adjusted HR (95% CI) was 1.2 (1.1, 1.3) for one, 1.1 (1.0, 1.2) for two, 1.2 (1.1, 1.3) for three and 1.2 (1.1, 1.4) for four or more as compared to none. Number of children was also associated with CVD among men; the adjusted HR (95% CI) was 1.1 (1.0, 1.2) for one, 1.0 (0.96, 1.1) for two, 1.1 (1.0, 1.2) for three and 1.1 (1.0, 1.3) for four or more as compared to none. There was no evidence of heterogeneity in the associations between sexes (p-value interaction 0.80). Number of offspring showed similar associations with ischemic heart disease and hypertensive disorders in both sexes. We observed similar associations between number of offspring and CVD in both sexes. The association among women might therefore be largely explained by unobserved behavioral and lifestyle characteristics.

Item Type:Articles
Status:Published
Refereed:Yes
Glasgow Author(s) Enlighten ID:Nelson, Professor Scott and Iliodromiti, Dr Stamatina
Authors: Magnus, M. C., Iliodromiti, S., Lawlor, D. A., Catov, J. M., Nelson, S. M., and Fraser, A.
College/School:College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > School of Medicine, Dentistry & Nursing
Journal Name:Epidemiology
Publisher:Lippincott, Williams and Wilkins
ISSN:1044-3983
ISSN (Online):1531-5487
Published Online:10 July 2017
Copyright Holders:Copyright © 2017 Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc.
First Published:First published in Epidemiology 28(6): 880-888
Publisher Policy:Reproduced under a Creative Commons license

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Project CodeAward NoProject NamePrincipal InvestigatorFunder's NameFunder RefLead Dept
695091Women's reproductive health and its relation to diabetes and cardiovascular healthStamatina IliodromitiMedical Research Council (MRC)MR/N015177/1MVLS MED - REPRODUCTIVE & MATERNAL MED