Hockey fans in training: a pilot pragmatic randomized controlled trial

Petrella, R. J. et al. (2017) Hockey fans in training: a pilot pragmatic randomized controlled trial. Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, 49(12), pp. 2506-2516. (doi:10.1249/MSS.0000000000001380) (PMID:28719494) (PMCID:PMC5704649)

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Abstract

Introduction: Hockey Fans in Training (Hockey FIT) is a gender-sensitized weight loss and healthy lifestyle program. We investigated: 1) feasibility of recruiting and retaining overweight and obese men into a pilot pragmatic randomized controlled trial; and 2) potential for Hockey FIT to lead to weight loss and improvements in other outcomes at 12 weeks and 12 months. Methods: Male fans of 2 ice hockey teams (35-65 years; body-mass index ≥28 kg/m2) located in Ontario (Canada) were randomized to intervention (Hockey FIT) or comparator (Wait-list Control). Hockey FIT includes a 12-week active phase (weekly, coach-led group meetings including provision of dietary information, practice of behaviour change techniques, and safe exercise sessions plus incremental pedometer walking) and a 40-week minimally-supported phase (smartphone app for sustaining physical activity; private online social network; standardized emails; booster session/reunion). Measurement at baseline and 12 weeks (both groups), and 12 months (intervention group only), included clinical outcomes (e.g., weight) and self-reported physical activity, diet, self-rated health. Results: Eighty men were recruited in 4 weeks; trial retention was >80% at 12 weeks and >75% at 12 months. At 12 weeks, the intervention group lost 3.6 (95% CI: -5.26, -1.90) kg more than the comparator (p<0.001) and maintained this weight loss to 12 months. The intervention group also demonstrated greater improvements in other clinical measures, physical activity, diet and self-rated health at 12 weeks; most sustained to 12 months. Conclusion: Results suggest feasible recruitment/retention of overweight and obese men in the Hockey FIT program. Results provide evidence for the potential effectiveness of Hockey FIT for weight loss and improved health in at-risk men and thus, evidence to proceed with a definitive trial.

Item Type:Articles
Status:Published
Refereed:Yes
Glasgow Author(s) Enlighten ID:Gray, Dr Lucinda and Wyke, Professor Sally and Hunt, Professor Kathryn and Bunn, Dr Christopher
Authors: Petrella, R. J., Gill, D. P., Zou, G., De Cruz, A., Riggin, B., Bartol, C., Danylchuk, K., Hunt, K., Wyke, S., Gray, C. M., Bunn, C., and Zwarenstein, M.
Subjects:R Medicine > RA Public aspects of medicine > RA0421 Public health. Hygiene. Preventive Medicine
College/School:College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > Institute of Health and Wellbeing > MRC/CSO Unit
College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > Institute of Health and Wellbeing > Social Scientists working in Health and Wellbeing
Journal Name:Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise
Publisher:Lippincott, Williams and Wilkins
ISSN:0195-9131
ISSN (Online):1530-0315
Published Online:17 July 2017
Copyright Holders:Copyright © 2017 The Authors
First Published:First published in Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise 49(12): 2506-2516
Publisher Policy:Reproduced under a Creative Commons License

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Project CodeAward NoProject NamePrincipal InvestigatorFunder's NameFunder RefLead Dept
727641SPHSU Core Renewal: Setting and Health Improvement Research ProgrammeKathryn HuntMedical Research Council (MRC)MC_UU_12017/12IHW - MRC/CSO SPHU