What environmental art can teach us about wind farms: exploring the boundaries of cultural aesthetics in Scottish landscapes

Layne, M. K. (2018) What environmental art can teach us about wind farms: exploring the boundaries of cultural aesthetics in Scottish landscapes. Landscape Research, 43(2), pp. 248-259. (doi: 10.1080/01426397.2017.1318118)

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Abstract

Installations in the Scottish landscape garner a range of public reactions, from being much-loved to much-maligned. Two categories of landscape installation illustrating this range of reactions are landscape art installations and wind farms, both of which at times have been both widely positively received and largely criticised and protested. Viewing installations such as these through the consideration of the cultural landscape, incorporating social, economic and political history into the natural landscape, offers new ways of understanding their impact on viewers. Using Casey’s boundary/border discourse and Berleant’s aesthetic engagement theory, this article considers the impact of wind farms and large-scale landscape art installations on the landscape, and critically considers Scottish Natural Heritage wind farm siting guidance in light of the theoretical frames presented. The article concludes that current policy and practices surrounding wind farms render them exclusionary and homogenous, and that openness and distinctiveness are essential for improving public perceptions.

Item Type:Articles
Status:Published
Refereed:Yes
Glasgow Author(s) Enlighten ID:Layne, Miss Mary Kristen
Authors: Layne, M. K.
College/School:College of Social Sciences > School of Interdisciplinary Studies
Journal Name:Landscape Research
Publisher:Taylor & Francis
ISSN:0142-6397
ISSN (Online):1469-9710
Published Online:05 July 2017

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