Dietary fat and total energy intake modifies the effect of genetic profile risk score on obesity: evidence from 48,170 UK Biobank participants

Celis-Morales, C. et al. (2017) Dietary fat and total energy intake modifies the effect of genetic profile risk score on obesity: evidence from 48,170 UK Biobank participants. International Journal of Obesity, (doi:10.1038/ijo.2017.169) (PMID:28736445) (Early Online Publication)

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Abstract

Background: Obesity is a multifactorial condition influenced by both genetics and lifestyle. The aim of this study was to investigate whether the association between a validated genetic profile risk score for obesity (GPRS-obesity) and body mass index (BMI) or waist circumference (WC) was modified by macronutrient intake in a large general population study. Methods: This study included cross-sectional data from 48 170 white European adults, aged 37–73 years, participating on the UK Biobank. Interactions between GPRS-obesity, and macronutrient intake (including total energy, protein, fat, carbohydrate and dietary fibre intake) and its effects on BMI and WC were investigated. Results: The 93-SNPs genetic profile risk score was associated with a higher BMI (β:0.57 kg.m−2 per standard deviation (s.d.) increase in GPRS, [95%CI:0.53–0.60]; P=1.9 × 10−183) independent of major confounding factors. There was a significant interaction between GPRS and total fat intake (P[interaction]=0.007). Among high fat intake individuals, BMI was higher by 0.60 [0.52, 0.67] kg.m−2 per s.d. increase in GPRS-obesity; the change in BMI with GPRS was lower among low fat intake individuals (β:0.50 [0.44, 0.57] kg.m-2). Significant interactions with similar patterns were observed for saturated fat intake (High β:0.66 [0.59, 0.73] versus Low β:0.49 [0.42, 0.55] kg.m-2, P-interaction=2 × 10-4), and total energy intake (High β:0.58 [0.51, 0.64] versus Low β:0.49 [0.42, 0.56] kg.m−2, P-interaction=0.019), but not for protein intake, carbohydrate intake and fiber intake (P-interaction >0.05). The findings were broadly similar using WC as the outcome. Conclusions: These data suggest that the benefits of reducing the intake of fats and total energy intake, may be more important in individuals with high genetic risk for obesity.

Item Type:Articles
Status:Early Online Publication
Refereed:Yes
Glasgow Author(s) Enlighten ID:Celis, Dr Carlos and Gray, Dr Stuart and Gill, Professor Jason and Welsh, Dr Paul and Iliodromiti, Dr Stamatina and Anderson, Dr Jana and Pell, Professor Jill and Mackay, Dr Daniel and Petermann, Mrs Fanny and Steell, Mr Lewis and Sattar, Professor Naveed and Bailey, Dr Mark and Lyall, Dr Donald
Authors: Celis-Morales, C., Lyall, D. M., Gray, S., Steell, L., Anderson, J., Iliodromiti, S., Welsh, P., Guo, Y., Petermann, F., Mackay, D. F., Bailey, M. E.S., Pell, J., Gill, J. M.R., and Sattar, N.
College/School:College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > Institute of Cardiovascular and Medical Sciences
College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > Institute of Health and Wellbeing > Public Health
College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > Institute of Molecular Cell and Systems Biology
College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > School of Medicine, Dentistry & Nursing
Journal Name:International Journal of Obesity
Publisher:Nature Publishing Group
ISSN:0307-0565
ISSN (Online):1476-5497
Published Online:24 July 2017
Copyright Holders:Copyright © 2017 Macmillan Publishers Limited
First Published:First published in International Journal of Obesity 2017
Publisher Policy:Reproduced in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher

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