Personal familiarity enhances sensitivity to horizontal structure during processing of face identity

Pachai, M. V., Sekuler, A. B., Bennett, P. J., Schyns, P. G. and Ramon, M. (2017) Personal familiarity enhances sensitivity to horizontal structure during processing of face identity. Journal of Vision, 17(6), 5. (doi:10.1167/17.6.5) (PMID:28593249)

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Abstract

What makes identification of familiar faces seemingly effortless? Recent studies using unfamiliar face stimuli suggest that selective processing of information conveyed by horizontally oriented spatial frequency components supports accurate performance in a variety of tasks involving matching of facial identity. Here, we studied upright and inverted face discrimination using stimuli with which observers were either unfamiliar or personally familiar (i.e., friends and colleagues). Our results reveal increased sensitivity to horizontal spatial frequency structure in personally familiar faces, further implicating the selective processing of this information in the face processing expertise exhibited by human observers throughout their daily lives.

Item Type:Articles
Additional Information:This work was supported by the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada and the Belgian National Foundation for Scientific Research. P. G. S. received support from the Wellcome Trust (UK; 107802) and MURI/EPSRC (USA, UK; 172046- 01).
Status:Published
Refereed:Yes
Glasgow Author(s) Enlighten ID:Schyns, Professor Philippe and Ramon, Ms Meike
Authors: Pachai, M. V., Sekuler, A. B., Bennett, P. J., Schyns, P. G., and Ramon, M.
College/School:College of Medical Veterinary and Life Sciences > Institute of Neuroscience and Psychology
Journal Name:Journal of Vision
Publisher:Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology
ISSN:1534-7362
ISSN (Online):1534-7362
Copyright Holders:Copyright © 2017 The Authors
First Published:First published in Journal of Vision 17(6): 5
Publisher Policy:Reproduced under a Creative Commons license

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Project CodeAward NoProject NamePrincipal InvestigatorFunder's NameFunder RefLead Dept
698281Brain Algorithmics: Reverse Engineering Dynamic Information Processing Networks from MEG time seriesPhilippe SchynsWellcome Trust (WELLCOTR)107802/Z/15/ZINP - CENTRE FOR COGNITIVE NEUROIMAGING