‘It’s good enough that children are accepted’: Roma migrant mothers’ views of their children’s education post-migration

Sime, D., Fassetta, G. and McClung, M. (2018) ‘It’s good enough that children are accepted’: Roma migrant mothers’ views of their children’s education post-migration. British Journal of Sociology of Education, 39(3), pp. 316-332. (doi:10.1080/01425692.2017.1343125)

[img]
Preview
Text
142463.pdf - Accepted Version

679kB

Abstract

The discrimination of Roma groups across Europe has been highlighted by several international organisations. For many, poverty, racism and their children’s systematic exclusion from education are ‘push’ factors when deciding to migrate. This study explores Roma mothers’ views of their children’s education post-migration and attitudes to education more broadly, by adopting an intersectional framework and examining issues of difference and belonging as experienced by Roma mothers and their children. While Roma mothers recognised the value of education for social mobility, they remained aware of the limited resources they could draw upon, in the absence of desirable economic and cultural capital, and as a result of their ethnicity, social class, gender and ‘undesirable migrant’ status. There was a perceived hopelessness in relation to the chances that Roma children have to overcome their marginalisation through schooling, pointing to the need for dedicated policy interventions when working with Roma families.

Item Type:Articles
Additional Information:This work was supported by the British Academy [grant ref. SG120406].
Status:Published
Refereed:Yes
Glasgow Author(s) Enlighten ID:Fassetta, Dr Giovanna
Authors: Sime, D., Fassetta, G., and McClung, M.
College/School:College of Social Sciences > School of Education > Creativity Culture and Faith
Journal Name:British Journal of Sociology of Education
Publisher:Taylor& Francis
ISSN:0142-5692
ISSN (Online):1465-3346
Published Online:07 July 2017
Copyright Holders:Copyright © 2017 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor and Francis Group
First Published:First published in British Journal of Sociology of Education 39(3):316-332
Publisher Policy:Reproduced in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher

University Staff: Request a correction | Enlighten Editors: Update this record